WHALEY-L Archives

Archiver > WHALEY > 2001-02 > 0982379948


From: "Elizabeth G. Brett" <>
Subject: RE: [WSP] Edward, Etc.
Date: Fri, 16 Feb 2001 22:19:08 -0500


Thank you all for all your help...I feel very enlightened. :)

Elizabeth (descendant of Eli Whaley - GA)

-----Original Message-----
From:Robert Whaley [SMTP:]
Sent:Friday, February 16, 2001 7:22 PM
To:
Subject:Fw: [WSP] Edward, Etc.



> Elizabeth-
>
> The answer to your question is yes and no. The Whalley family, of which
> Edward the Regicide and his brother Henry belong to, originated in England
> and have a long history of land ownership there. That is a subject better
> left for another time, the detail of the story is lengthy. I have been
very
> fortunate to have recently uncovered "new" information regarding Edward
> Whalley's family and his early life that I plan to publish in the very
near
> future.
>
> This same branch of the Whalley family served in Ireland in various
> capacities during the English Civil Wars as soldiers and later returned as
> recipients of lands awarded to them as members of Cromwell's military
force
> and the Protectorate's transplantation of the conquered Irish. Two of
> Edward's sons, John and his step-brother Henry served under Henry Cromwell
> in Ireland. Judge Advocate Henry Whalley, Edward's brother, was awarded
> lands in Ireland by Oliver Cromwell to cover arrears in payment for
Henry's
> service to the Protectorate. Henry was eventually deprived of some of
these
> lands just prior to the Restoration of Charles II but some of his
> descendents were willed and possessed other lands in Ireland. Tradition
has
> it that a group of
> Whal(l)eys who sprang from this branch of the family eventually immigrated
> to America and later to California.
>
> A little less than a rough thumbnail sketch but those are the basics.
>
> Robert Whaley
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Elizabeth G. Brett" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2001 10:16 AM
> Subject: RE: [WSP] Edward, Etc.
>
>
> > So when you mention Irish land records...were the
> > Whalleys..Whaleys...mainly Irish?
> >
> > Elizabeth
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Robert Whaley [SMTP:]
> > Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2001 11:13 PM
> > To:
> > Subject: [WSP] Edward, Etc.
> >
> > Frank Whalley's piece was very much on the mark for a number of reasons
.
> > First of all, it is unfortunate but, written records of the Whalley
> family
> > are sadly lacking. The primary reason appears to be that the family
> itself
> > was not especially astute to what future generations might question
about
> > the family history so, consequently, there is very little in the way of
> > either saved family correspondences or particular historical accounts by
> > any immediate family member. Nothing was left for posterity or if it
was
> ,
> > those records are as yet undiscovered. Typically, this is the vehicle
> that
> > most historians use to trace family roots. What can be learned about
the
> > Whalley family history must, therefore, be gleaned from other sources.
> > Secondly, there was a natural tendency of the 17th century Whalley
family
> > members to 'keep a low profile' as it were, because of the badge of
infamy
> > with which so many Cromwellian officials and family members were
branded.
> > I have seen substantia!
> > l evidence of this in both the Whalley family and the Goffe family.
> Edward
> > Whalley and William Goffe were, by far, the most infamous regicides to
> > survive Charles II's purges.
> >
> > There remains, however, a path to the Whalley family history. It is
> > certainly not straight line, but it may eventually get to the final
> > destination. The path is, again as Mr. Whalley points out, by way of
> > associates and Whalley family comrades. In particular I am finding that
> > Ireland holds many of these keys. Edward's brothers and sons have left
a
> > trail of "breadcrumbs" that we can follow. Henry Whalley, Edward's
> > brother, and Henry's children have, through wills and land deeds,
> > unintentionally left many clues behind. This is the focus of
considerable
> > ongoing research and may indeed yield many important answers. The irony
> is
> > that many historians and genealogists believe that all important Irish
> > records were destroyed in 1922 and that fact definitely is not the case.
> > There is plenty of uncharted water left to explore.
> >
> > There is much more to follow. The internet age has given genealogists
the
> > tools to solve many of these old mysteries.
> >
> > Robert Whaley
> > Rochester, NY
> >
> >
> >
>


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