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From: Les Tate <>
Subject: Re: [S-I] Re; 1840 & Methodista
Date: Mon, 12 Mar 2012 09:48:50 -0700
References: <mailman.207.1331504887.11193.scotch-irish@rootsweb.com><4F5D48DC.90204@utvinternet.com>
In-Reply-To: <4F5D48DC.90204@utvinternet.com>


Apparently it was a five mile rule, not one mile.

From http://www.localhistories.org/christian.html
Charles II became king in 1660. The king was not particularly religious but parliament was determined to crack down on the many independent churches that had sprung up and make Anglicanism the state religion again.

They passed a series of acts called the Clarendon code, a series of laws to persecute non-conformists (Protestants who did not belong to the Church of England). The Corporation Act of 1661 said that all officials in towns must be members of the Church of England.

The Act of Uniformity 1662 said that all clergy must use the Book of Common Prayer. About 2,000 clergy who disagreed resigned. Furthermore the Conventicle Act of 1664 forbade unauthorised religious meetings of more than 5 people unless they were all of the same household.

Finally the Five Mile Act of 1665 forbade non-Anglican ministers to come within 5 miles of incorporated towns. (Towns with a mayor and corporation). However these measures did not stop the non-conformists meeting or preaching.

See also
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Mile_Act_1665
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conventicle_Act_1664
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=47375


Les Tate
============
On Mar 11, 2012, at 5:52 PM, D H wrote:

> Oh there is plenty on churches not being allowed within a mile of towns...
>
>
> Early Presbyterians in Ballybay
>
> About 1690 Presbyterians began worshipping at Derryvalley, about a mile outside Ballybay. In those times, it was illegal to have a Presbyterian church
> within one Irish mile of a town. Toward the end of the decade, a congregation was formed and a minister called. The congregation first met in an old
> thatched building and, beginning in 1786, in the present meeting house..... http://www.magoo.com/hugh/cahans.html
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> In the early decades of the seventeenth century, intermarriage of the Ulster Irish with the newly arriving Scots, and conversion of the Irish of
> Ulster to Presbyterianism, seem to have been common. In her book, /The Catholics of Ulster/ (Basic Books 2001), Professor Marianne Elliot implies that
> much of the Catholic gentry disappeared from Ulster, not because they were exiled and dispossessed by their Protestant neighbors, but because they
> were converted. There were legal pressures to convert to the Church of Ireland. Conversion of the Irish in the 1700s, however, became less frequent,
> probably because such a conversion lead to ostracism of the Catholic. In The Scotch-Irish---A Social History
> <http://www.greenmanreview.com/scotch.html>(Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina Press, 1962)
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
>
> "As far as funerals are concerned, again I would like a reference."..Yep, no problem... See St Salvator's Church records entry for 7 Dec 1845 for example. Also Termonfeckin Church records. There is a very interest item on "the man that way killed by a dead man"..at Drumany Bridge opposite Sandpit Church Hall, Termonfeckin.
>
>
> My g.g. uncle was employed by a church to guard against theses burials and like I said...AND to also stop the taking of cadavers!
>
>
> _______________________________________________________________
>
> Your ancestors may indeed sleep peacefully in the Kells and Connor graveyard...but are there "secret burials" there?? Most probably!
>
> No, I'm not confusing the 5 mile act with the 1 mile act, thank you!!
>
> DH
>
>
>
>
> On 11/03/2012 22:28, wrote:
>> As far as restrictions of where Nonconformist meeting houses could be
>> built, I suspect that you are getting confused over the 5 mile act which was
>> part of the Clarendon Code. What was more effective about where Meeting
>> Houses could be built was the refusal of the Landowner to make a site
>> available. You see Shore Street Presbyterian Church in Donaghadee built
>> between high and low watermark.
>>
>> As far as funerals are concerned, again I would like a reference. My
>> ancestors sleep peacefully in the Kells and Connor graveyard. People guarded
>> graveyards to prevent grave robbers, as the University Anatomy departments
>> expanded, or private Anatomy Classes as in the Notorious Dr Knox in
>> Edinburgh.
>
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