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From: Sharon Oddie Brown <>
Subject: [S-I] THE WESTMORLAND GAZETTE, and KENDAL ADVERTISER, January 29,1820 / FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2011 13:25:21 -0800


I am forwarding this from the Westmorland list. The last item might be
of interest to those who had family in Baltimore in 1820.
SHaron
Sharon Oddie Brown Roberts Creek, BC, Canada. History Project:
http://www.thesilverbowl.com/ Blog:
http://sharonoddiebrown.blogspot.com/ Some Become Flowers:
http://www.harbourpublishing.com/title/SomeBecomeFlowers Family Tree:
http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=silverbowl


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: [ENG-WESTMORLAND] THE WESTMORLAND GAZETTE, and KENDAL
ADVERTISER, January 29, 1820 / FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.
Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2010 14:40:41 -0400
From: Barb Baker <>
Reply-To:
To: <>



THE WESTMORLAND GAZETTE, and KENDAL ADVERTISER.
Printed and Published for the Proprietors by J. KILNER, Market-Place,
Kendal; Saturday, January 29, 1820; VOL. III - No. 91.
Price Seven-Pence.
==============================================

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.

Copy of a letter from Porto Bello, dated the 9th instant:

"The English prisoners (meaning those deserted by that worthless vagabond
M'GREGOR) or rather English slaves as he made them, are in a most pitiable
state, nothing can be worse; they work from sunrise to sunset; and, I am
sorry to say, there has been a great change for the worse in the manner of
treating them; their food consists of a bullock's head, boiled with a little
salt and water, and this is the whole they have to subsist on, divided
amongst twenty-five or thirty, as the number makes no difference; they have
neither rice, bread, nor vegetables; and this scanty allowance is served but
once a day, which the poor fellows divide into two meals, that they may have
the appearance of breakfast and dinner. With such treatment, and working in
the heat of a boiling sun all day, it is impossible for them long to exist;
indeed they are dying at the rate of nearly two a-day. Out of the original
number of these unfortunate people, only fifty-five now remain alive, and
one half of them are in hospital."
===================

As a proof of the scarcity of money and the stagnation prevailing in Spain,
letters of the 23d ult. from Asturias, mention that the Escunda wheat, the
best and always the dearest grown in the Peninsula, was then selling at
eighteen rials (3s. 6d.) the fanega corresponding to1-1/2 bushel. The
fanega of harrice beans were selling at twelve rials,and of Indidan corn at
nine.Meat and other eatables were in the same proportion. It is a fact that
in Spain, since the commencement of the Revolution, land has fallen nearly
three hundred per cent, and the imposts have increased eighty.
==================

The "Gazette de France" contains a statement of the taxes paid by the
inhabitants of Paris, from which it appears that that city contributes
ninety-eight millions of francs to the service of the State, out of a
revenue of eight hundred and fifty millions. It is then deduced that
700,000 Parisians, forming the fortieth part of the population of France,
pay more than the ninth part of the taxes imposed on a population of
29,000,000 of Frenchmen. The average contribution of an inhabitant of Paris
is therefore 168 francs per annum, while that of the rest of the population
of France is 26 francs per head; and thus a Parisian pays six times as much
towards the support of the State as an inhabitant of the departments.
===================

KINGSTON, Nov. 6 - a cutter from England, laden with military stores for the
Independents, was stranded on the Grand Bar at the mouth of the Orinoco,
upon the Congrero shore; crew saved, but cargo lost.
===================

AMERICAN TRADE. - "The Trade of the once flourishing city of Baltimore"
says an article from that place, dated October 18, "has, within the present
year, become so limited, that very few, in any branch of merchandize, are
able to clear expenses. The situation of many of our banking institutions
is such as will, probably, for years prevent dividends being declared by
them; and these dividends have, heretofore, been the sole support of many
families, composed of widows and orphans, who will now be reduced to great
indigence. The awful calamity which has visited one part of our city, will
be the means of increasing our burthens for the support of the poor in no
inconsiderable degree;therefore, every expedient which can in any degree
tend to diminish the pressure of these burthens, becomes an important
consideration."
===================



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