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Archiver > Scotch-Irish > 2010-04 > 1272655405


From:
Subject: Re: [S-I] Mitchell, Scotch/Irish New York to Michigan
Date: Fri, 30 Apr 2010 19:23:25 +0000 (UTC)
In-Reply-To: <715842AF1E2944DA896F2F3FE876665E@WeesiePC>


Hi Louise, if they entered the USA by ship, then they may be on a ship list since the USA government passed a law requiring that all entrants be documented in 1820. There are many strategies for searching these, that vary over time as various on line services index more of these. (I have to refigure out the best way to do this now e very time).

This accounts for 2/3rds of those who came to the USA. For Canadian figures, check Canadian sources. One third came in through Canada, I have read. Depressing........

You use the US censuses to id when they came and if they were naturalized. If naturalized you can sometimes access naturalization paper work (three types, the first, the intent, being most likely to have information). Footnote.com has a lot of naturalization paperwork on line.

As for why they came, that is the subject of many books and articles. Pick up just about any genealogy mag in the bookstore or library and at least once a year it discusses the topic. You can also find an abundance of information on line. "Emigrants and Exiles" by Kerby Miller discusses Irish emigration and "Going to America" by Terry Coleman focuses on the 'mass trans-Atlantic emigrations of the mid-19th century" as it says on the back. Of course you've heard of the Famine, so you're talking up the lead up to the Famine. What do you think it was like?

By the mid 19th century of course it wasn't just about getting out of Ireland to avoid Ireland and its never ending problems but much much more about the draw or lure of life in America and an economy such as we have not really seen since, growing wildly in leaps and bounds, fueled by the industrial revolution. These people didn't come with the goal of becoming dirt farmers (or medieval 'yeoman') like the migrants of the colonial days.

"Going to America" discusses various British colonies that arose in the USA -- and to one my paternal ancestors went, I learned. It talks about ships and the journey and why they came and why they left from wherever. The first half of the 19th century saw the changeover from sailing ships to steam, from ships hauling passengers as a side business to a whole new industry carting people over the Pond, the shift from largely Protestants from the industrialized parts of Ireland to a majority of Catholics from the rural west and south. It's a great era to read about!

For specifics on your family you need to do genealogy, of course, using information found in the censuses, tax records, land records, and probates to establish the economic conditions of your ancestors and how that changed over the years. But it'll make a lot more sense if you read a book like "Going to America".

The Canadian entries are the big problems.... No border crossings either. They just manifest in Michigan or Ohio one day, having crossed by ferry. Quarter immigrants, did someone say they were called on the cities on the Great Lakes?? My father, who was probably not paying attention during the original discussion, told me his grandparents entered through Canada -- but I found them on an American ship list. It took a while because there are HUGE numbers of immigrant ships and a lot of indexing to do. As we quickly index them, voila!!!! There they are. Used to be you spend a LOT of time in the back of a FHL cranking film through a full year of ships. Didn't find them in New York? Then you checked Baltimore, Philly, Boston, etc, etc, etc, till your right arm was very musclely and you had decided to take up a differnt hobby. Now it can be easy, though it never really is, it seems.

Most recent case: a man who said in his naturalization papers he came on a certain date in 1888, left the port blank, and named a ghost ship that never existed by that name. Of course not in Ancestry, etc, etc. What is this guy hiding? Apparently a lot! No baptism or civil registration in Ireland in the parish he said he came from, no parental marriage record either. Though the parish exists and has records. Hmmmmmm I think we can forget getting Irish citizen based on this guy! Luckily his wife was easier to trace. No records of this guy anywhere in Ireland that is now on line, which is most of the place (free at www.irishgenealogy.ie and a few other places with civil registration at the pilot program of family search.)......Mr. Mystery! And his parents too. Never married, never born, never baptized. No doubt a certain portion of our colonial ancestors also hid their pasts and that is why you can't find them: They had no intentions of ever being found by anyone, ever.

Linda Merle

----- Original Message -----
From: "Louise Acheson" <>
To:
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2010 2:31:42 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [S-I] Mitchell, Scotch/Irish New York to Michigan

I have this same problem. They came in 1840. No other info about from where
in Ulster. I wonder what was happening in 1840 to come here??? Your info
might help me thanks Linda-from Louise

--------------------------------------------------
From: <>
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2010 9:56 AM
To: <>
Subject: Re: [S-I] Mitchell, Scotch/Irish New York to Michigan

> Hi Karen,
>
> It's good you are trying to learn how your parents got from Armagh to
> Canada in 1840. The way you research this is to study the methodology. You
> can do this by buying or borrowing books on the topic, attending lectures
> on records documenting Canadian immigration from Ulster, downloading
> lectures, reading them free on line, googling. A summary is here:
> http://www.theshipslist.com/Research/canadarecords.htm
>
> The first thing you will notice is that Canada didn't begin to keep
> records with a few exceptions till 1865. You may then notice your date is
> before this. So how long do you want to try to learn about an event that
> may well not be documented in any record, anywhere? You can spend 20 or 30
> years doing this, or 50 or more. At the end you could be very grouchy and
> none the wiser. There are strategies for locating information -- in family
> histories, county histories, etc, etc, etc, etc. I often cite
> www.genealogical.com/university.html as a place to go to. It has a chart
> that details the possible sources to find information about migration. You
> can also improve your analysis skills and learn how to analyze the data
> you already have to indentify clues that you have overlooked. This sounds
> immensely boring and unexciting, but I only hope that when I get back to
> my family history I have overlooked some of the astonishing buried
> treasures found in what clients of mine have sent.
>
> Still, if no one documented the name of the ship in your family, you may
> have to channel them from the other side. Even this is risky. I assume,
> anyway, if we called back my great aunt, who migrated at the age of 4 with
> her family from Scotland in 1893 and who in her later years wrote a letter
> documenting what she knew, that she'd give the same ship name as she did
> in her letter. Unfortunately, she was wrong. It didn't take long to
> discover that no su ch ship as she named existed in 1893 or ever lugged
> people from Scotland to the USA. However there was a similar named ship.
> Sure enough, I found them on a passenger list for THAT ship. Move back
> another hundred years or more -- there are plenty of errors in our holy,
> received family histories. Sometimes you gotta work around the family
> history <grin>. Or the opinions of deceased ancestors called back from the
> grave to the spiritual circle.....
>
> I'd check Filby and then turn to hunting up oral family history that has
> been preserved in collateral lines, if not your own.
>
> Linda Merle
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Karen" <>
> To:
> Sent: Friday, April 30, 2010 8:37:51 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
> Subject: Re: [S-I] Mitchell, Scotch/Irish New York to Michigan
>
> Mary, how did you learn the ship they cdamne on? I'm trying to larn how my
> great great grandparents got from Co. Armagh to Canada in 1840. Many
> thanks,
> Karen
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Mary Widener" <>
> To: <>
> Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2010 9:51 PM
> Subject: Re: [S-I] Mitchell, Scotch/Irish New York to Michigan
>
>
>
> My Scotch Irish came to Abbeville, S. Carolina in 1767 from Belfast.
> Directly to Charleston, S. Carolina, have the ship they came over on and
> the
> land they were given, Matthew and James SHANKS, Matthew the father, his
> wife
> died enroute from Belfast and James was only about 4 or 5 years old when
> they arrived. James had an uncle who had previously come over, a Robert
> WILSON
> Mary Widener
>
> --- On Thu, 4/29/10, Sarah <> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
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