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Archiver > Scotch-Irish > 2001-03 > 0985467638


From: Charles Clark <>
Subject: Re: [Scotch-Irish] English Customs (Caveat emptor))
Date: Sun, 25 Mar 2001 09:00:38 +1200
References: <ee.129b9725.27e604ed@aol.com> <3AB8936C.3525@snet.net> <000801c0b216$6a5edb80$71011942@houston.rr.com> <3ABA71CD.4B01@snet.net> <000701c0b3f7$7acca5a0$9480e33f@default>


Carl - I like your sense of perspective and determination to view your ancestors
by their own lights and not by today's standards, which may, for all we know, be
looked at in 300 years' time as equally strange. Certainly the events of Ireland
over the past century will be looked askance at by future historians, and I am
sure the same applies to a lot fo the things we accept as normal.
Further than than, I find I have rellies who have ended up in several different
situations and cultures, and find that each lot has to be judged by a different
set of standards, none of which is applicable today.
witch-burning is one thing that I have never come across in my background (or at
least not so far, all I know of is a couple of Wilson sisters who were staked
out to be drowned by the incoming tide). However I have an American cousin who
at least enquired about owning slaves.

agnew1 wrote:

> Hi List
>
> I have the personal papers of some of my Scotch-Irish ancestors that show
> them taking part in witch burnings, something that would horrify anyone
> today! But was, from the papers I have been reading from my ancestors
> diaries, an accepted part of society in the 17th century Scotch-Irish. I
> try not to use the current society rules or ethics to judge someone who
> lived 500 years before. It's not a valid rule stick to view them them by.
> They had social and economic pressures and issues that might not be as valid
> today. Such as the role of religion, agriculture and military obligations.
> For this reason they have to be viewed in light of how their behavior
> compared with that of their peers. Otherwise our perspective might be
> invalid and not as reliable to develop an understanding of the rules they
> lived by!
> Carl Stevenson




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