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Archiver > QUEBEC-RESEARCH > 2011-01 > 1294764121


From: Mona Andrée Rainville <>
Subject: Re: [Q-R] Bonneterre
Date: Tue, 11 Jan 2011 11:42:01 -0500
References: <75d74.2dbd2e9e.3a5cbb4a@aol.com> <4D2B6500.1040708@videotron.ca><AANLkTi=2vynvrBki4MmmMksimq9uXGafDo1TtdzYKmLz@mail.gmail.com><4D2B6F1D.30006@videotron.ca><AANLkTinbMOHCMxfqVF8xLThSc4rrqghpMrYLMfMXXOVU@mail.gmail.com>
In-Reply-To: <AANLkTinbMOHCMxfqVF8xLThSc4rrqghpMrYLMfMXXOVU@mail.gmail.com>


Well James,

Let's just say Linda received a full answer from me.

And so did you.

Cheers,

Mona

James LaLone wrote:
> Yes, thanks, I thought she was just trying to get a translation of the
> name, not a whole document, thanks, Jim.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 3:42 PM, Mona Andrée Rainville
> < <mailto:>> wrote:
>
> Quite simply, James,
>
> In doing the formal translation of a document, names are never
> translated.
>
> This, of course, does not mean that names are not transformed,
> transmogriphied, disguised, morphed, or altogether changed by
> their bearers or persons around them.
>
> One of most usual way of "tuning" a name to its new environment is
> to make it sound like it belongs there, like it fits in. It is
> not, strictly speaking, a translation even if in some case, such
> as your Roi/King, the result is the same. At times, it also
> simply involved giving it a different pronunciation closer to a
> name better known in these parts, like Mikaelchuk becoming McCullough.
>
> The point is, it would not be grammatically correct, if one is
> translating a document from French to English, to translate "Jean
> Roi" to "John King", or vice versa, a Mary Black is not a Marie
> Noire.
>
> Does that answer your question, James,
>
> Mona
>
>
>
>
> James LaLone wrote:
>> Mona, could you please elaborate on your statement "someone is
>> bound to point out that proper names are not to translated". I
>> have seen surnames translated such as ROY to KING.
>> Thanks, Jim.
>>
>> On Mon, Jan 10, 2011 at 2:58 PM, Mona Andrée Rainville
>> < <mailto:>> wrote:
>>
>> Hello Linda,
>>
>> I am sure someone is bound to point out that proper names are
>> not to
>> translated.
>>
>> But, "bonne terre", which means "good earth", could have become
>> "Goodearth" or even "Goodland" to someone less tuned to the
>> finer rules
>> of grammar... ;-)
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Mona
>>
>>
>>
>> <mailto:> wrote:
>> > Hello list,
>> >
>> > Could someone tell me what the "name" Bonneterre
>> translates to in English.
>> >
>> > Thanks!
>> > Linda
>>


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