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Archiver > QUEBEC-RESEARCH > 2009-03 > 1236784788


From: Mona Andrée Rainville <>
Subject: Re: [Q-R] TRANSLATION PLEASE
Date: Wed, 11 Mar 2009 11:19:48 -0400
References: <00e901c9a1fd$9431f6b0$4b74e918@yourm5d4u9r2uv><49B7AE2D.3080500@videotron.ca><a75cd802.fa0c.4cf6.9c72.56bf9101d2c3@aol.com>
In-Reply-To: <a75cd802.fa0c.4cf6.9c72.56bf9101d2c3@aol.com>


Thank you for pointing out this work, John,

For those who would like to consult it - it is in French - the work has
been put on-line by the U of Chicago.

http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/efts/ARTFL/projects/dicos/TLF-NICOT/

Cheers,

Mona

owentagart wrote:
> Bonjour, cousins et cousines
>
> The basic distinction, both in French and in English, is between
> "charpentier" <>"menuisier", or "carpenter" <> "joiner", and then
> among the carpenters, between "charpentier de grosses oeuvres" who
> specialize (then and now) in major construction projects -- sailing
> ships, cathedrals, public buildings -- and house builders.
>
> The article in Nicot, Thresor de la langue française (1606) explains
> the distinction quite clearly: The original (with its early 17th
> century spelling and vocabulary) is followed by my translation:
>
>
> Le François fait difference entre Charpentier et Menusier. Car
> cestuy-là besogne de la grande coignée, et esbauche le gros bois,
> comme poutres, solives, et les pieces servans à la construction du
> faiste et galetage des maisons, granges, pressoirs estables, clochers,
> ponts de bois, dont le bois y servant, est aussi appelé Charpente, et
> autres tels gros ouvrages. Et cestui-ci ne besongne que de la petite,
> coignée, du cizeau, et rabot pour menuiserie, dont il prend le nom,
> comme en façon de licts, tables, coffres, huis, bancs, escabelles,
> fenestres, et semblables choses de bois de taille en menues pieces, et
> és ouvrages et fringoteries qu'on y veut mettre dessus.
>
> The French language distinguishes between Charpentier and Menuisier.
> The former wields the great axe, and works with large timbers, such
> as beams, rafters, and other pieces which are used in the building of
> the roof and gables of houses, barns, wine-presses, stables, bell
> towers, wooden bridges, and other major projects, in which the pieces
> of wood used are called /charpente,/ (in English, frame-work). The
> latter works with the small adze, the chisel, and the plane to do
> /menuiserie (literally “small work”) /from which he takes his name.
> (The same is true in English: the work is called /“joinery”,/ and the
> craftsman is called a /“joiner”)./ The joiner builds beds, tables,
> chests, doors, benches, ladders, windows, and similar objects of wood
> cut into small pieces, as well as the decorative work that might be
> attachedthem.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
> In a message dated 03/11/09 08:28:09 Eastern Daylight Time,
> writes:
>
> Good morning Jeannette,
>
> A "charpentier de grosses oeuvres" was a carpenter specialized in
> large
> framing work.
>
> Traditionally, in New France the expression was usually reserved to
> describe boat builders.
>
> But in some rare cases, it also described cathedral frame builders.
>
> In France, it meant both.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Mona
>
>
>
> wrote:
> > Hi Everyone
> >
> > Just came across an occupation which I do not understand. Can
> SKS translate
> > for me?
> >
> > Occupation: Charpentier de grosses oeuvres
> >
> > I understand the charpentier, but not the rest.
> >
> > God Bless,
> > Jeannette
> >
> >
>
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