QUEBEC-RESEARCH-L Archives

Archiver > QUEBEC-RESEARCH > 2004-08 > 1093466953


From:
Subject: Excerpt Of History
Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 16:49:22 EDT


Body Snatchers
Eighteenth-century criminals William Burke and William Hare suffocated
unsuspecting travellers in a Scottish lodging house. The corpses, which were sold
for anatomical dissection. It is thought that at least 16 people were
disposed of in this way.
******************************************************************************
*********


Armour-Plated
Ned Kelly, the famous 19th-century Australian bank robber, wore home-made
armour. On the run for 2 years, his capture and that of his gang cost £89,500.
******************************************************************************
***********


Witch Hunt
At the end of the 17th century, 150 alleged witches were condemned in the
town of Salem, Massachusetts.
******************************************************************************
***********


Jack the Ripper terrorised the East End of London in 1888, when he cut the
throats of 5 women. Guesses at his identity include a royal duke, a doctor
and a barrister.
*******************
**********************************************************************


Highway Robbery
Mary Frith, who was born in London in 1584, trained as a seamstress. Unable
to endure a quiet life, she became a pickpocket. Taking the name of Moll
Cutpurse, she dressed as a man and with her gang of thieves made a fortune by
robbing unsuspecting travellers on wild and deserted roads.
******************************************************************************
*********



For The Chop
The guillotine, used to chop off heads during the French Revolution, was the
official means of execution in France until 1981.
******************************************************************************
*********


Stock Still
In Medieval times, thieves and drunkards were put in the stocks, a wooden
bench with leg-irons.
******************************************************************************
*********

Hanging Horse
The largest-existing Roman bronze sculpture, a statue of Emperor Marcus
Aurelius, was used as a gibbet in 965 AD.
******************************************************************************
**********

Pilloried
Dishonest traders in Medieval times were put in a pillory, a contraption
with holes for the victim's head and hands. Passers-by would throw dung at
them.
******************************************************************************
***********



Out For A Duck
A Medieval ducking stool was a chair on the end of a pole. Scolding women
were fastened to it and plunged into a river, a pond, or even a cesspit.
******************************************************************************
**********


Keep Mum! A Medieval branks, or scold's bridle, was an iron cage fitted
round the head of a nagging wife to keep her quiet. Some branks had spiked
tongue plates.





This thread: