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From: "Joyce Crete" <>
Subject: RE: Fw: [Q-R] translation help again please
Date: Wed, 29 Oct 2003 20:16:02 -0500
In-Reply-To: <115.2a9c0071.2cd172ed@aol.com>


Hello - In the English schools we were taught Parisian French and when
combining the language around the house and neighbourhood we learned a
mixture of both. What would you say was the dialect that was used say in
New Brunswick as I found it different from either Quebec or Paris types.
Cheers Joyce Crete

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:]
Sent: October 29, 2003 2:46 PM
To:
Subject: Re: Fw: [Q-R] translation help again please


In a message dated 10/29/03 01:54:22 PM Eastern Standard Time,
writes:

> Ahleese,
> I understand in Quebec the french that is spoken is called " Normandy
> french"  which, apparently was the french spoken in France when the
settlers
> made their journey to New France. Quebec has retained that french and
France
> has modernized hers (please note, I have no official source for this, just
> what I was told when I was a wee p'tite fille). The french from France is
> very different than the one I speak. "les francais" have a hard time
> understanding "les Quebequois" because the dialect is so different
although
> I personnaly do not have a hard time understanding "le francais de
France".
> I have met a  lot of Acadians and have no difficulty understanding them
> either, I don't find their french to be to different than some areas in
> Quebec.

If you were to visit Normandie, Picardie, or Perche, you would find that
people in those regions speak with accents very close to the Quebecois
accents.
These were the regions that accounted for a goodly number of early
habitants,
and formed the Quebec accent.   But, in my travels, I have found there are
regional differences in regional accent between, let's say, Montreal and
Beauce.   
The point about vocabulary is well taken. Quebec vocabulary tends to be more
"conservative" than French vocabulary, that is, there are some words which
are
current in Quebec that would be considered somewhat "obsolete" in France. 
But that distinction too, is found from one region to another both in France
and
in Quebec.   For instance, how is the English word "doll" translated?  If
you
say "poupée", you are using a more modern word, than if you say, "catin". 
Both words are used in Quebec; only poupée is used in France.


Fr. Owen Taggart

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