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Archiver > QBC-MONTREAL > 2007-03 > 1173295613


From: "genechaser" <>
Subject: Re: [MONTREAL] Languages & Irish tongue
Date: Wed, 7 Mar 2007 14:26:53 -0500
References: <8C92EF7F9C761AC-940-3637@webmail-da09.sysops.aol.com>


I knew the Gaelic was different than English but did not consider before the difficulties
the Irish coming to Canada might have experienced trying to fit in with the English speaking
as well as the French and Native Indian. These along with the orange and the
green struggles have given me new clues when searching for the movement of my relatives.

The Irish people for the most part did not seem to have difficulties in blending in with the Quebec population. Intermarriage between the French, English and
Irish immigrants occurred on a regular basis and I think for the most part,
people, no matter what nationality they were, learned to understand
each other and got along very well. My gt. grandfather, born of an Irish father and French Canadian mother was fluently bilingual. (As a French Canadian born in Quebec, her roots went back to County Wicklow, Ireland).
My gt. gt. grandparents were also a mixture of Irish and French. My gt. grandfather married an English immigrant who came to Montreal in 1875. They had nine children and all of them were fluent in both languages. Quebec, like all other provinces (and the U.S.), was made up of French, English, Scottish, Italians, etc. etc. I don't believe there was a large percentage of First Nation's people living in Montreal or other large Canadian cities, for that matter, but those who did, communicated very well in English and/or French.

In the 1950s I attended a English Catholic school in downtown Montreal which drew students from across the city and was a real melting pot of Irish, English, Ukrainian, Russian, Latvian, German, Italian and just about every other country in Europe. Most were fluent in English and those who weren't, soon learned. In many cases, they also learned to speak French!.

Take a look at the website below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada

Dorothy






That was great teaching folks.
I am sure that many have learned much about the teaching or not of French to the Irish in Montreal.
It has helped clear up a few stories and now I understand some of the veterans comments
when they spoke about the French Cdn. soldiers not being able to speak to the
French oversees... guess it was a similar situation to what Doreen's brother experienced.

I knew the Gaelic was different than English but did not consider before the difficulties
the Irish coming to Canada might have experienced trying to fit in with the English speaking
as well as the French and Native Indian. These along with the orange and the
green struggles have given me new clues when searching for the movement of my relatives.

Thanks to all.
June


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