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Subject: News from Pennsburg - September 24, 1904
Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 01:46:53 EDT


Ref: Town and Country Newspaper
Pennsburg, Montgomery County, PA
Saturday - September 24, 1904

STUDENT ARRESTED

Julio FERNANDEZ, the son of a wealthy New York cigar manufacturer, and a
student at Ursinus College, Collegeville, was arrested in Philadelphia on Monday
as a vagrant. The youth, it is said, ran away from college and was trying to
beat his way to New York. A patrolman saw FERDANDEZ in the Reading Railway
freight yards at Third and Berks streets. He saw him trying to conceal himself
in an outbound freight train. FERNANDEZ, although his linen was soiled from
the dust of the road, was dressed in stylish clothing and needed only a
brushing up to appear in his real role of a well-to-do college man. The policeman,
not used to that style of the genus hobo, arrested FERNANDEZ. He said that he
did not like the idea of going to college and had started home without his
father's consent. He had gone to Philadelphia with the intention of riding to
New York on a freight train.

CUBAN BOY'S DASH FROM COLLEGE

Julio FERNANDEZ, the son of a wealthy New York cigar manufacturer and a
student of Ursinus College, Collegeville, who was arrested in Philadelphia Monday
as a vagrant, was arrested again Thursday evening while trying to beat his
way to New York on a freight train. The boys was taken to Ursinus College on
Tuesday, but he was not satisfied and wanted to return to New York to see his
mother, who is to sail for Cuba. Thursday morning he escaped from the college,
and after walking ten miles boarded a freight train at Perkiomen Junction.
Passing through Philadelphia he was arrested. The boys is 12 years old.

STORE ROBBED AT PERKASIE

In spite of a watchman, electric lights and other precautions, burglars got
away with several hundred dollars, worth of merchandise from KULP Brothers'
store, at Perkasie, Monday night or Tuesday morning. Entrance was secured in a
professional manner through a rear first-story window. First the rear door
was tried. The glass was broken, but an iron bar prevented easy, rapid ingress.
Then the thieves made a ladder, bored a hole in the shutter, slid the bolt,
forced a window up and entered. They went directly to the silk counter, where
fifty-four pieces of the best goods were taken, found the key to the safe
and stole $5 in cash, neglected the cash register - retreated the same way they
came in, and left with the booty without leaving a clue. There were two
suspicious characters - a man, and a flashily-dressed, much bepowdered woman - in
the store in the morning. The man tried to purchase tobacco tags, the woman
looked carefully over the silks, but failed to purchase, saying she would
write from Hatboro for goods. The firm is insured against robbery.

DRANK 75-YEAR OLD APPLEJACK

While workmen were tearing down the old stone building belonging to the
ZIEGLER estate, at Dillingersville, and which had been erected nearly
three-quarters of a century ago, they on Wednesday found imbedded in the mortar in the
rear wall a two-gallon wicker-covered demijohn. In it was a little over a
quart of applejack, possibly all that remained of the two gallons. The applejack
was of the consistency of glycerine, and a tablespoonful made a man feel
exceedingly salubrious. One of the workmen swallowed a glassful of it, and he was
dead to the world for over three hours.

MAN WHO SCARED GIRL TO DEATH A MANIAC

The case against Joseph HEISER, who a few months ago became suddenly insane
at Torresdale and, it is alleged, frightened little Mary RANKIN, aged 5 years,
so badly that she died from shock, was heard Wednesday afternoon in the
Bucks County Criminal Court. HEISER was indicted for involuntary manslaughter,
but upon agreement of counsel Judge STOUT instructed the jury to return a
verdict of not guilty on account of insanity, which was done. The court will have
HEISER placed in some hospital.

LANTERN UPSET; $1500 FIRE

A lighted lantern, carried by A.C. BERGNER, in Moses H. WAGNER's barn, at
Shartlesville, upset and exploded, scattering burning oil in all directions. The
building with all the season's crops, was burned to the ground, entailing a
loss of $1500.

COWS POISONED; BARN FIRED; SUSPECT SPITE

A terrible revenge was visited upon Melvin H. ZIEGLER, a Skippack farmer,
during Monday night, and the attempt to destroy his property and live stock was
partially successful. Mr. ZIEGLER resides on a portion of the Anthony SEIPT
homestead farm in the village of Skippack. About one o'clock Tuesday morning
his hay house which is the next building to the school house, was discovered
to be afire. The ringing of the bell at the fire company house brought forth
the volunteer firemen with their apparatus, but the flames had gained such
headway in the inflammable contents, that the hay and the building were entirely
consumed, in the presence of the firemen who were powerless to aid. Mr.
ZIEGLER went to bed mourning his loss, little thinking that a new sorrow awaited
him with the breaking of the morning light. When he went to the barn Tuesday
morning he found evidence that confirmed his suspicions that the hay house
was fired by an incendiary's torch, for paris green had been given four cows.
The poison had been placed in the troughs of the animals and Mr. ZIEGLER had
every reason to believe that the cows had eaten the death-potion with other
feed with which it was mixed. Medical aid was summoned and all the cows but one
were saved. Mr. ZIEGLER is at a loss to know who could have held such
vicious spite toward him, and his neighbors are greatly incensed at the deed. His
loss by fire fully covered by insurance in the Mutual Insurance Company of
Chester County. Several weeks ago Mr. ZIEGLER shot at and, he thinks, wounded
chicken thieves, who had bagged some of his fowls, but were compelled to leave
their booty behind. It is thought one of the thieves was wounded and came
back for revenge.

SMALLEST BABY'S HEAD SIZE OF BILLARD BALL

One of the smallest babies born for many years arrived at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Frank MANCUSE, of Jersey Shore, Pa. The infant is a boy, and weighs
about one and a half pounds only, the same as when he was born a week ago. His
head is smaller than a billiard ball.

A FAMILY REUNION AT DALE

A family reunion and surprise party was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
John SNYDER, of Dale, Berks county, on Sunday. Quite a large number of people
were present and spent a pleasant day. Frank COVELY entertained the guests with
choice music.

CLASSES MET AT POTTSTOWN

The annual session of Goshenhoppen Classis of the Reformed Church, at
Pottstown, on Monday evening. Interesting addresses were made by Rev. D.K.
LAUDENSLAGER, Rev. O.R. FRANTZ and Miss Eva HILLEGASS.

LIGHTNING BROKE THRESHING MACHINE

Farmers who were threshing wheat near the barn of D.F. WENKS, at near
Gettysburg were driven to shelter by a thunderstorm. A moment later a bolt of
lightning struck the threshing machine and wrecked it completely.

CURIOUS CABBAGE STALKS

A curiosity of note is growing in the truck patch of Mrs. Issac J. BEANS, in
Worcester, Montgomery county. Two stalks of cabbage, one bearing four and the
other six perfect heads are the freaks.

NEW COUNTERFEIT $5 BILLS

A new counterfeit $5 gold certificate has been discovered. The picture of
President GARFIELD stands out boldly, and the bills are stamped "United States
National Bank, of Norristown, N.J."

KILLED BY FALL DOWNSTAIRS

Jonas FRAVEL, 68 years old, of Rittersville, fell down a flight of stairs at
his home Sunday morning and was killed. His neck was broken.








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