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From: "tom kunesh" <>
Subject: [OLD-SOUTH-BURIALS] STKSHTWS = HTWSSTKS
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2008 16:17:06 -0400 (EDT)


Carol - thanks for the photo.

the letters on the capstone on the gravemarker
should be read starting at 12o'clock and clockwise:
H T W S S T K S. many of us start at 6o'clock and get a different
combination: S T K S H T W S.

S.T.K.S.H.T.W.S. >should be read> H.T.W.S.S.T.K.S.
which is ...
the Mark Master Degree of Royal Arch Masonry

"the candidate carries represents a keystone, and has the initials H. T.
W. S. S. T. K. S. engraved upon it in a circle." ...

"Here the Right Worshipful Master calls the candidate's attention to the
keystone before him, by pointing out to him the initials on the stone,
which he is informed read as follows:--
HIRAM, TYRIAN, WIDOW'S SON, SENDETH TO KING SOLOMON."

----

Royal Arch Masonry
the Mark Master Degree

The Mark Master Degree is believed to have originated as a ceremony of
registering a craftsman's mark in those years distinguished by operative
craft masons and their temple building. It was later developed into a
full-fledged degree by the Masonic fraternity as we know it today, Some
scholars say it was the earliest degree and may predate all others by many
years. It is highly regarded by students in all Masonry, teaching lessons
that have proven of value in all walks of life. Some Grand Lodges place so
high an eminence on the Mark Master Degree, that they confine it to the
jurisdiction of a separate grand body, the Grand Lodge of Mark Masters.

http://reames.royalarchmason.org/degrees

----

Key Stone

... the primary legend of our Craft centers on the building of King
Solomon's Temple

----

read the whole thing at http://www.sacred-texts.com/mas/dun/dun05.htm
Duncan's Masonic Ritual and Monitor: Mark Master, or Fourth Degree
MARK MASTER, OR FOURTH DEGREE.

The candidate is then furnished with a block representing a keystone,
which he is requested to carry between the thumb and two first fingers of
the right hand, the other fingers clinched with the nails tight against
the palm, the arm extended down perpendicularly at the side. The two
officers carry their blocks in the same manner. The three are styled
"Workmen from the quarries." As we have before said, the block which the
candidate carries represents a keystone, and has the initials H. T. W. S.
S. T. K. S. engraved upon it in a circle.

...

Candidate presents the keystone.

Junior Overseer (applying his square to it, and finding it does not
fit.)--This is a curiously wrought stone, indeed; it is neither oblong nor
square; good work, true work, square work is only such as we have orders
to receive; neither has it the mark of any of the craft upon it. Is that
your mark? (Pointing to the letters on the keystone.)

Candidate--It is not.

Junior Overseer--Owing to its singular form and beauty, I feel unwilling
to reject it; you will pass on to the Senior Overseer at the west gate for
his inspection.

The conductors and the candidate pass on to the Senior Overseer's station
in the west, when the same scene is repeated, and they are directed to
proceed to the Master Overseer at the east gate.

The Senior Deacon here first presents his block or stone to the Master
Overseer.

Master Overseer (applying his square.)--This is good work, true work, and
square work--just such work as I am authorized to receive and pass for the
building. You are entitled to your wages--pass on.

The conductors pass on, and take their seats. The candidate then presents
his keystone.

Master Overseer (applying his square.)--This is a curiously wrought stone.
It appears to be neither oblong nor square, and the mark upon it is not
that of a craftsman. (Looking sternly at candidate.) Is this your work?

Candidate--It is not.

Master Overseer--Where did you get it?

Candidate--I picked it up in the quarry.

Master Overseer--Why do you bring another man's work to impose upon the
Overseers? You will stand aside.

p. 160

The Master Overseer now stamps on the floor four times with his foot,
which brings up the other two Overseers.

Master Overseer--Brother Junior Overseer, dial you suffer this work to
pass your inspection?

Junior Overseer--I did; I observed to the young craftsman, at the time,
that the stone was not such as we had orders to receive; but, owing to its
singular form and beauty, I felt unwilling to reject it, and suffered it
to pass to the Senior Overseer at the west gate.

Senior Overseer--I made the same observations to the young craftsman, and
for the same reason permitted it to pass to the Master Overseer at the
east gate.

R. W. M.--Why, you see the stone is neither oblong nor square, neither has
it the mark of any of the craft upon it. Do you know this mark that is
upon it?

Junior Overseer--I do not.

Senior Overseer--Neither do I.

Master Overseer--What shall I do with it?

Junior Overseer--I propose we heave it over among the rubbish. 1

Master Overseer--Agreed.

The Master and Senior Overseers take up the keystone, and swinging it four
times back and forth between them, the fourth time the Junior Overseer
catches it over the left shoulder of the Master Overseer (in imitation of
the sign of "heave-over," see Fig. 19), and throws it aside.




The Right Worshipful Master, after admonishing the candidate never to give
the words in any way but that in which he received them, resumes his seat,
when the brethren shuffle about their feet.

R. W. M--What means this disturbance among the workmen, Brother Senior?

S. G. W. (rising.)--Right Worshipful, the workmen are at a stand for the
want of a certain keystone to one of the principal arches, which no one
has had orders to make.

R. W. M.--A keystone to one of the principal arches? I gave our Grand
Master, Hiram Abiff, strict orders to make that keystone, previous to his
assassination. (Gives two raps with his gavel, which brings the three
Overseers before him.) Brother Overseers, has there been a stone of this
description brought up for inspection? (Exhibiting the figure of a
keystone.)

Master Overseers--There was a stone of that description brought up for
inspection, but it being neither oblong nor square, nor having the mark of
any of the craft upon it, and we not knowing the mark that was upon it,
supposed it unfit for the building, and it was thrown over among the
rubbish.

R. W. M.--Let immediate search be made for it; the Temple cannot be
finished without it; it is one of the most valuable stones in the whole
building. (The brethren then shuffle about the Lodge again, and find the
keystone, and bring it up to the east.)

p. 171

The Senior Warden takes the stone from the hands of the brethren, and then
reports to the Right Worshipful Master as follows:--

Right Worshipful Master, the stone has been found; it was discovered
buried in the rubbish of the Temple, and I herewith transmit it to you, by
trusty brothers. (Two or three of the brethren carry it to the Right
Worshipful Master in the east.

The Right Worshipful Master receives the keystone and places it in front
of him, on the desk, upright and plumb, with the initials on it facing the
whole Lodge, but more especially the candidate, who is seated in a chair
in front of the Right Worshipful Master. 1

The Right Worshipful Master gives four raps with the gavel (• • • •), when
all rise to their feet. (Some Lodges do not do so, but keep their seats.)
When he reads the following passages of Scripture, at the end of each
passage he strikes the keystone on the top with his gavel--first, one rap;
second, two raps; and so on to the fourth passage, viz.:

Right Worshipful Master strikes the keystone once. (•) "The stone which
the builders refused is become the head stone of the corner."--Ps. cxviii.
22.

Right Worshipful Master strikes the keystone twice. (• •) Did ye never
read in the Scriptures, "The stone which the builders rejected is become
the head of the corner"?--Matt. xxi. 42.

Right Worshipful Master strikes the keystone thrice. (• • •) And have you
not read this Scripture, "The stone which the builders rejected is become
the head of the corner"?--Mark xii. 10.

Right Worshipful Master strikes the keystone four times. (• • • •)

What is this, then, that is written, "The stone which the builders
rejected is become the head of the corner"?--Luke xx. 17.

Master reads to candidate from text-book: "To him that overcometh will I
give to eat of the hidden manna, and I will give him a white stone, and in
the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth, saving him that
receiveth it." (Rev. xi. 17.) Come forward, and receive the new name.

Candidate steps forward.

Master--Brother, I will now invest you with the new name

p. 172

that none but a Mark Master can receive. It is a circle of letters which
are the general mark of this Degree.

Here the Right Worshipful Master calls the candidate's attention to the
keystone before him, by pointing out to him the initials on the stone,
which he is informed read as follows:--

HIRAM, TYRIAN, WIDOW'S SON, SENDETH TO KING SOLOMON.
HIRAM, TYRIAN, WIDOW'S SON, SENDETH TO KING SOLOMON.

The candidate is here instructed how to read the words when challenged by
any stranger, which is as follows:--

R. W. M.--Hiram.

Candidate--Tyrian.

R. W. M.--Widow's.

Candidate--Son.

R. W. M.--Sendeth.

Candidate--To.

R. W. M.--King.

Candidate--Solomon.

R. W. M. (pointing to the centre within the circle of these
letters.)--Within this circle of letters every Mark Master Mason must
place his own private mark, which may be any device he may choose to
select; and when you have selected your mark, and it is once regularly
recorded in the Book of Marks of this or any other Lodge of which you may
be chosen a member, you have no more right to change it than you have to
change your own name.

Marks are not generally recorded; this duty is very much neglected--it
should be done, and strictly enforced in every Lodge.

Master reads to candidate: "He that hath an ear to hear, let him
hear."--Rev. iii. 13.

The Master further instructs the candidate in the signs of the penalties
of this Degree (see Figs. 19, 20, 21, and 22), and then presents, or
points out to him on the chart, the working-tools of a Mark Master Mason,
viz.: a mallet and chisel, the use of which he explains as follows:--

The chisel morally demonstrates the advantages of discipline and
education. The mind, like the diamond in its original state,



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tom <>



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