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Archiver > NCGRANVI > 2007-10 > 1192012044


From:
Subject: Re: [NCGRANVI] Knap of Reeds
Date: Wed, 10 Oct 2007 06:27:24 -0400
References: <101020070212.5200.470C34F000051A4D0000145022058891160A9A040D0E0B090E03@comcast.net><000401c80af1$7f829700$a648bcd0@duffy><A887F6ED-A4EF-41E0-9DFF-C50FF2502963@bellsouth.net>
In-Reply-To: <A887F6ED-A4EF-41E0-9DFF-C50FF2502963@bellsouth.net>


Hi Betty,
Are you related to the Roses that connect with the Allens?
Katie

On 10/10/07, Betty Rose <> wrote:
>
> Some info from the book, "Roaming Around Southern Granville County
> and Vicinity" by John H. Wilson, Jr.: 2004 pp. 190 - 195.....
>
> On page 191, a paragraph states that "Knap of Reeds is mentioned in
> Colonial Records as Knapp of Reeds, Knap of Reeds and Nap of Reeds.
> The name could be a corruption of an Indian name. We know Indians
> camped on the Old Indian Trail that ran through Knap of Reeds as
> early as the 1300's."
>
> "The Tuscarora Indians, a very warlike tribe, lived along the Neuse
> River Tributaries in the Knap of Reeds vicinity. The original paths
> the Indians used were believed to have been made by buffalo that
> lived in Granville County prior to 1300."
>
> "Scottish settlers were some of the first non-native Americans to
> settle at Knap of Reeds. In Scotland the word knap (the noun) means
> knoll or hillside and the word knap (the verb) is associated with
> arrowheads and the reeds used for the shafts of the arrows. Perhaps
> the name "Knap of Reeds" came from a knoll or knap by a creek where
> reeds grew."
>
> "Knap of Reeds was one of the oldest communities in Granville County
> but the community no longer exists." p. 190
>
> Hope this helps a bit!
>
> Betty
> On Oct 9, 2007, at 11:56 PM, Nola Duffy wrote:
>
> > Thanks so much!
> >
> > Nola
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: <>
> > To: <>
> > Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2007 9:12 PM
> > Subject: Re: [NCGRANVI] Knap of Reeds
> >
> >
> >> The Knap of Reeds Creek was most likely named for some
> >> local geographic feature of the time..... Scottish in
> >> origin, the word, Knap, means: hillock, knoll, rounded
> >> knob, lump, or bump. Reeds, of course, are grass-like
> >> plants growing in shallow water or on marshy ground, or a
> >> knap.....
> >> r/Steven
> >>
> >> -------------- Original message --------------
> >> From: "Nola Duffy" <>
> >>
> >>> Does anyone on the list know the origins of the name of
> >>> Knap
> >>> of Reeds?
> >>>
> >>> Nola
> >>>
> >>>
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