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From: Nan Brennan <>
Subject: [IRISH-IN-CHICAGO] IAHC upcoming events
Date: Thu, 27 Dec 2007 01:01:35 -0600


Irish Amer Book Discussion
The Irish American Heritage Center book discussion
Free and open to the public

January 13 . . . .Chicago Stories . . . . . . . James T. Farrell
February 10 . . .Donegal Woman . . . . . . John Throne
March 9 . . . . . .Ironweed . . . . . . . . . . . . William Kennedy
April 13 . . . . . .Looking for Jimmy. . . . . .Peter Quinn
May 4 . . . . . .Irish Fairy and Folktales . W.B. Yeats, ed.

http://www.irishamhc.com/library.asp

Sun, Jan 6 3:00 PM

Intersections: Present, Past and Future in Irish Culture

> The Irish American Heritage Center and the DePaul University’s
> Irish Studies Program present an ongoing lecture series by
> scholars, artists, journalists and public figures.
>
> Intersections: Present, Past and Future in Irish Culture addresses
> issues relating to the fast-changing culture, economy and
> historical sense of both the Republic and Northern Ireland.
>
> The lectures will be held the first Sunday of each month at 2pm and
> are free.
>
> NOTE: The January 6 lecture will be at 3:00pm.
>
> The January lecture, The Christian Religion: The Troubles
> (1968-1998) and the Good Friday Agreement features two speakers;
> Jack Leahy, Professor Emeritus, DePaul University and Joe McCartin,
> former MEP and Vice President and Auditor of the European Peoples
> Party. Leahy will discuss the religious aspects of the Good Friday
> Agreement, while McCartin will cover the political and economic
> standpoint of the Agreement.
>
> The February 3 lecture, Roddy Doyle’s Fiction: Yesterday’s
> Triumph’s, Today’s Challenges, will focus on Irish writer, Roddy
> Doyle and his impact on contemporary Irish literature. Jim
> Fairhall, Ph.D. Interim Director of the Irish Studies Program
> DePaul University, will discuss Doyle’s work.
>
> Doyle, a Booker Prize winner who is also Ireland's most popular
> writer, has created in “Barrytown”, a fictional Northside Dublin
> setting that might be compared to Brian Friel's Ballybeg. Doyle is
> a writer who claims, unlike Friel and his Field Day colleagues, to
> have no designs on his readers' minds. Yet, like Friel and many
> other Irish writers going back to Yeats, Joyce and beyond, he
> explores the theme of Irish identity.
>
> For more information, call the IAHC at 773-282-7035, ext 10.
>










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