GenMassachusetts-L Archives

Archiver > GenMassachusetts > 2002-07 > 1026059940


From:
Subject: [GM-L] History of the Town of Concord, Mass., Chapter IV Part 28 - p.59
Date: Sun, 7 Jul 2002 12:39:00 EDT


Subject: Concord, Massachusetts - Chapter IV - Part 28
Source: History of the Town of Concord, Mass. by Lemuel Shattuck, Boston,
1835

Part 28
-1676-

p.59

>From this time, which was more propitious to the Indians than any other,
their success
gradually diminished. This battle was the turning point. The principal body
of the
Indians, however, tarried in the vicinity of Groton, Lancaster and
Marlborough, whence
they could easily make incursions to annoy the English.

On the 22d of April, the Council ordered 40 troopers out of Suffolk under the
command of
Cornet Jacob Eliot; and the same number from Middlesex under Major Gookin, to
march forth-
with to Sudbury to make discovery, whether, "the motion of the enemy be
either toward Con-
cord or Medfield," by visiting the bounds of those towns, and scouting
through the woods.
An atttack on Concord had been expected* and this was one of the effectual
means which were
promptly taken to prevent it.

*Tradition has handed down the following anecdote. A consultation among the
Indian chiefs
took place about this time on the high lands in Stow, and as they cast their
eyes toward
Sudbury and Concord, a question arose which they should attack first. The
decision was made
to attack Sudbury. One of the principal chiefs said, "We no prosper, if we
go to Concord -
the Great Spirit love that people - the evil spirit tell us not to go - they
have a great
man there - he great pray!" The Reverend Edward Bulkeley was then minister
of the town,
and his name and distinguished character were known even to the red men of
the forest.

On the 26th, six cart-loads of provisions were sent by the government to
Concord and John
Flint was appointed commissary to take charge of them. The
commander-in-chief engaged to
be there the next day, making that his place of rendezvous. The following
original letter
addressed to Governor Leverett is deemed worthy of publication:

"Concord, April 29, 1676.
"Honored Sir.
"By reason that I had not a guide to go with me, it was yesterday in the
forenoon ere I
reached this place, where I found a few men; but ere night, all the
commanders and most of
the soldiers that yet appeare, were come up with the provision. This day we
rendezvoused
and find a great defect, an account of which is inclosed. Upon receipt of
the Hon. Major
General's letter, I have by advice of the commanders, as well for the ease of
this town as
the securing of as many as we can at present, ordered Capt. Sill to
Chelmsford, Capt.
Haughthorn to Billerica and Capt. Holbrook to abide here,

p.60

and proportioned the horse accordingly; and am going myself to Chelmsford
about some Indians
to be ready in order to what is in my instructions, and shall wait for
further orders as
commander. I have not yet taken any of our provision, supposing it to be for
us when in
motion; but it is expected by the inhabitants that we should spend thereof.
I crave dir-
ections herein. Some things is much wanting and desired by the captains to
be sent for,
viz., flynts, tobacco, liquor, pipes. There is but 29 that appeareth of my
troop, and not
above 7 carbines among them. I desire there may be a supply thereof; as also
a saddle and
case of pistols for myself; having here borrowed a saddle and left the tree
(?) and skinn that was pressed for me. Colours wanting also for the troop
and one company and a trumpeter.

"Not any appearance of the 30 Norfolkmen. It is desired that some more of
the Indians may be sent to us, hearing them at Chelmsford are fortifying
about a fishing place there. A
chyrurgeon with medicaments is much expected, also a minister; the which I
hope may be procured here. All the commanders, officers and souldiers,
express much cheerfullness and
have hope that the defects will be be made up; that we may be in a better
capacity to serve
the country. I shall not further inlarge, but to begg your honors prayers
for us.

Remaining Sir your humble servant.

D. Henchman."

To be continued - Chapter IV - Part 29 - p.60
Transcribed by Janice Farnsworth


This thread: