GERMAN-BOHEMIAN-L Archives

Archiver > GERMAN-BOHEMIAN > 2006-08 > 1156529670


From:
Subject: Re: [GERMAN-BOHEMIAN] Character Map
Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2006 14:14:30 EDT


There is good keyboard information at:
_http://www.starr.net/is/type/kbh.html#map_
(http://www.starr.net/is/type/kbh.html#map)

and information on installing or activating other keyboards is at:

_http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/international/keyboards/winkey.html#instal
l_
(http://tlt.its.psu.edu/suggestions/international/keyboards/winkey.html#install)

Find many other very good sites with an Internet search using:
US International keyboard map

I found a printout of the US English - International keyboard and it helps a
lot.
_http://www.usna.edu/LangStudy/US-InternationalLayout.html_
(http://www.usna.edu/LangStudy/US-InternationalLayout.html)

On that keyboard ä (a-umlaut) is made by typing shift quotation mark first
and then the letter a or A. -- or "o:" or "u".

The á (any letter with the right accent) is made with the comma and the
letter.

The caret (^) is made with shift 6 followed by the desired letter.

The à (left accent) is made by typing that key (far left of the numeric row)
followed by the letter to have the accent.

There is also the little circle over a vowel used fairly often in GB
dialect: º.
Å å on the International Keyboard are made by holding down the alt key on
the RIGHT side of the keyboard and typing the letter "W:" Hold down the
shift key with the alt key to get the capital A with the little circle. I
believe that A is the only letter that ever has that mark.

The "a" with the little circle is also available with a numeric code 0197.

Using the numeric keypad requires 5-6 keystrokes instead of two on the
International keyboard.

With the International keyboard when a certain letter, quotation mark,
comma, or caret are meant instead of the diacritical mark just type that key as
usual followed by the spacebar.

Learning when and when not to use the spacebar has been a lot quicker for me
than learning the codes from the numeric pad. I also found that sometimes
diacriticals made by using the numeric pad will end up as
garbarge characters in Emails received by some ISPs.

The characters generated on the US International Keyboard seem to go through
sending in Email OK.

There is another option and that is to install a German keyboard or a Czech
or other keyboard as aptional. You can change to the desired keyboard with
one Macro key and change back to English with the same key. The German
keyboard offers vowels with umlauts already on them.

NOTE that searching the Internet using the ae, oe, or ue spelling instead of
the umlauts on German words will generally find the same number of hits.
Using that spelling can save having to learn anything new on the keyboard.

However, the German keyboard has some letters rearranged like the Z and the
Y and that can slow you down a bit if you are a touch typist.

I have the alternate German keyboard but find the US International one so
much easier to use that I hardly ever switch to it.

I have never installed the Czech keyboard but that is another option as a
alternate keyboard for those who know Czech.

Here is the entire ansi characters code for the numeric pad found at:
_http://www.usna.edu/LangStudy/international_keyboards.html_
(http://www.usna.edu/LangStudy/international_keyboards.html)


0160 0161 ¡ 0162 ¢ 0163 £ 0164 ¤ 0165 ¥ 0166 ¦ 0167
§ 0168 ¨ 0169 © 0170 ª 0171 « 0172 ¬ 0173 ­ 0174 ®
0175 ¯ 0176 ° 0177 ± 0178 ² 0179 ³ 0180 ´ 0181 µ 0182 ¶
0183 · 0184 ¸ 0185 ¹ 0186 º 0187 » 0188 ¼ 0189 ½ 0190
¾ 0191 ¿ 0192 À 0193 Á 0194 Â 0195 Ã 0196 Ä 0197 Å
0198 Æ 0199 Ç 0200 È 0201 É 0202 Ê 0203 Ë 0204 Ì 0205 Í
0206 Î 0207 Ï 0208 Ð 0209 Ñ 0210 Ò 0211 Ó 0212 Ô 0213 Õ
0214 Ö 0215 × 0216 Ø 0217 Ù 0218 Ú 0219 Û 0220 Ü 0221 Ý
0222 Þ 0223 ß 0224 à 0225 á 0226 â 0227 ã 0228 ä 0229
å 0230 æ 0231 ç 0232 è 0233 é 0234 ê 0235 ë 0236 ì
0237 í 0238 î 0239 ï 0240 ð 0241 ñ 0242 ò 0243 ó 0244 ô
0245 õ 0246 ö 0247 ÷ 0248 ø 0249 ù 0250 ú 0251 û 0252 ü
0253 ý 0254 þ 0255

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