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Archiver > GER-VOLGA > 2001-06 > 0993137531


From: "thelma mills" <>
Subject: Re: [GV] length of Russian Military obligations
Date: Thu, 21 Jun 2001 10:32:11 -0500
References: <20010621025843.18893.qmail@web5504.mail.yahoo.com> <3B31A048.232FAB00@global.co.za>


Hello - my grandfather's Military Certificate states that Joseph
Kinderknecht was accepted into service as a soldier of the first
classification until the age of 43 years old, until January 1, 1910
(beginning year 1/1/1888). He was dismissed from the regular service on
January 1, 1906. Then it says "according to the achievements during the
exercises, can not be listed as a reservist". Given in the city of
Novouzensk in January of 1906.

He then came to America in April, 1908 with his family.
I had the documents transcribed. They were so fragile, i almost hated to
have nayone handle them. Thelma Mills

----- Original Message -----
From: "Vera Beljakova" <>
To: <>
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2001 2:20 AM
Subject: [GV] length of Russian Military obligations


> German colonists and other non-ethnic Russian minorities served less time
in the
> army
> (5 yrs), if they knew Russian language and were "literate" (could read
and write),
>
> than did those who knew no Russian. ( a very big incentive to go to school
and
> learn Russian).
>
> There were also "reservists" (on call but not on duty).
>
> I do not have at my fingertips the exact years when the length of service
changed,
> down from 25 yrs ( 1 in every 100 villagers was called up = 10% of
able-bodies men
> )
> during the time of Peter the Great ( nobles also had to serve 25 yrs !!!!
eithr in
> the army or civil service ),
> and it gradually came down to 5 yrs (as the conscription net widened to
> incorporate non-ethnic Russians),
> with a penalty of an extra 2 yrs if they did not know the national
language.
> Russians thought it unfair that SOME the German farmer-colonists tried to
get out
> of
> national military service.
> But there were all sorts of clauses and conditions whereby a man could
legally
> evade a draft.
> eg: son of a widowed mother, breadwinner of the family, only son, etc
etc...
> In some regions who could pay another man to substitute you.
> In Kossack villages they were given a quota of men to submit to the army.
> The villagers then paid the men to volunteer, and kept their families....
> Each rule had plenty of exceptions.
>
> Vera Beljakova-Miller
>
> "Suzanne Heinitz D." wrote:
>
> > My great uncle, George Heinitz (spelled Heintz on his discharge papers),
served
> > in the Russian Army as a Border Guard, from January 1, 1899 and was
discharged
> > into the reserve Dec 24, 1903. So that adds up to five years for him.
He was
> > taken into service by the Novouzinske (?) military board district #4.
> > Suzanne Heinitz D.
> > --- wrote:
> > >
> > > In a message dated 6/20/01 7:08:23 PM, writes:
> > >
> > > << I have heard several accounts of the length of service for the
German
> > > Draftees into the Russian military. I was told that my grandfather
Phillip
> > > Werner was commited for seven years.
> > > Did the length vary or was it standardized?
> > > Byron Eisner
> > > >>
> > >
> > > ==========
> > > Seven years is the amount of time that my great uncle served. My
> > > grandfather, who was younger, came to the USA rather than serve.
> > > Ruth Schultz,
> > > Village: Norka; Surnames: Blum, Frueauf, Scheidemann, Weitzel
> > >
> >
> > =====
> > Someday you'll be an ancestor too!
>
>


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