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Archiver > GENMTD > 1997-08 > 0870632406-01


From: &quot;L-Soft list server at Apple (1.8c)&quot; <a href="mailto:">&lt;&gt;</a>
Subject: File: &quot;GENMTD-L LOG9412E&quot;
Date: Sun, 3 Aug 1997 14:20:06 -0400


X-Message:
Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 22:42:56 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From:
Subject: Census Records

Why does it appear that most census takers wrote with the
pen grasped between their toes, while looking into a mirror
over their shoulder, with the paper behind them, in poor
lighting conditions, during a windstorm, while balancing
cannonballs on their head?

I was just curious.

Garry ()

------------------------------------------------------------
Most of our ancestors were not genealogists, otherwise
they would have made it easier for US to find THEM.
------------------------------------------------------------

[ It's less amusing to pose this question, but anyone have any good
references on reading old-style handwriting? -Mod. ]
X-Message:
Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 22:47:18 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Robert Marshall &lt;&gt;
Organization: Netcom
Subject: Re: Military Service

In &lt;3cvbid$&gt; Clara Nistler &lt;&gt;
writes:
&gt;
&gt;Where can a person write to verify tour of duty in the US Navy? I'm
&gt;researching deceased relative who served during the VietNam war. Any
&gt;help will be appreciated. Thanks!

Records for the Viet Nam War are ONLY available to the person who
served, their spouse, and immediate children.

As to a source, try the National Archives. They have a listing for
where to write for what records. I cannot remember off the top of my
head where to write to, nor do I have my list at hand.

Good luck.

Robert Marshall

X-Message:
Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 23:09:35 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Bill &amp; Kitti Lauer &lt;&gt;
Organization: Management Safety Data Systems
Subject: Need Help Getting Started ...

We are trying to locate the family surname--- WESTBELD. We know that
two brothers came to Amer. around the early 1800's. We have not been
able to locate the family name in Europe. Could someone help us? We
have been to AZ to the Morman Temple to review their records, talked
with relatives, looked at census infor. HELP HELP HELP-- me E-mail
---

Thanks Kitti
X-Message:
Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 23:12:58 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Mark Syvret &lt;&gt;
Organization: George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA
Subject: Somerset House?

I am looking for any information about Somerset House and
researching my family tree. I would like to spend a couple of days
there next summer, and wanted to know what access is like, if they are
computerised, etc. I am English and my wife is Scottish, so I assume
we would be able to access all the records we need there. HELP!

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
I will not stand for intolerance. Duuh, I mean........ oh, never mind.
MARCO THE DC DEMON
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
X-Message:
Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 23:16:27 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: &quot;T. Phelps&quot; &lt;&gt;
Organization: University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
Subject: Drafts in Sterling from US

I recently received a reply to a request for copies of records held in
England. Naturally enough the request was for payment in Sterling.
The amount is small, about $14. My local bank wants $17 (the customer
rate!) to issue a Sterling draft. I expect to have to pay some kind
of premium, but $17 a this seems a bit high. At that price, my
foreign research will come to a screeching halt.

What methods have others used to pay for material where foreign
currency is requested?

Tom Phelps

X-Message:
Date: Mon, 26 Dec 1994 23:19:30 PST
Reply-To: Rickste465 &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Rickste465 &lt;&gt;
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject: KY obituary search?

People wishing to get a copy of an obituary from a paper in
Illinois can write to the Ill. State Historical Library and get a
search made. You have to provide them with the date and locality.
They will then search the papers in nearby towns and copy it for a
small fee, but only if they find it.

My question is, is there similar help available in Kentucky?
Have the newspapers in Kentucky been micro-filmed as they have been in
Illinois?

Rick
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 08:19:48 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Scott McGee &lt;&gt;
Organization: Microware Systems Corporation, Des Moines, Iowa
Subject: Carbon Paper

I was wondering if anyone has found a method to improve legibility of
carbon copies of typewritten documents. My grandfather took many notes
and seems to have made carbon copies of each. I have some in my possesion,
but find some of them VERY hard to read. Only think I have found so far
is the old &quot;eye strain&quot; method. conbined with cross-referencing with other
stuff to sort out the things I still can't read for sure.

Scott
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:02:36 PST
Reply-To:
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Will Sulzner &lt;&gt;
Organization: Cruzio Community Networking System, Santa Cruz, CA
Subject: Re: Census Records

In article &lt;3docvk$&gt;, writes:
&gt;
&gt; Why does it appear that most census takers wrote with the
&gt; pen grasped between their toes, while looking into a mirror
&gt; over their shoulder, with the paper behind them, in poor
&gt; lighting conditions, during a windstorm, while balancing
&gt; cannonballs on their head?
&gt;
&gt; [ It's less amusing to pose this question, but anyone have any good
&gt; references on reading old-style handwriting? -Mod. ]

The only obvious problem with &quot;old-style&quot; writing other than
the occassional &quot;f&quot; for &quot;s&quot;, especially in the form of &quot;Rofs&quot;
for &quot;Ross&quot; is the initial capitals. When in doubt about them,
look through the book for obvious names using those initial letters:
&quot;John&quot;, &quot;Thos&quot; or &quot;Mary&quot;.

Wm
--
=============================================================== Wmm
Wm Cox Sulzner 117 Felix #10 Santa Cruz CA 95060
Internet FidoNet Will Sulzner 1:216/506
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:06:49 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: William Mills &lt;&gt;
Organization: Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
Subject: Re: Census Records

In article &lt;3docvk$&gt;,
&lt;&gt; wrote:

&gt;Why does it appear that most census takers wrote with the
&gt;pen grasped between their toes, while looking into a mirror
&gt;over their shoulder, with the paper behind them, in poor
&gt;lighting conditions, during a windstorm, while balancing
&gt;cannonballs on their head?

We could take it personally, as in a conspiracy to prevent
genealogists from finding imprtant information. I suspect it's more
that they were paid by the name, and just got hurried about it. Since
the National Archives typically has the second copy (copied by hand of
course), it's even worse, since copying was probably done in more of a
rush than the original.

&gt;[ It's less amusing to pose this question, but anyone have any good
&gt; references on reading old-style handwriting? -Mod. ]

I have found E. Kay Kirkham's &quot;The Handwriting of American Records
for 300 Years&quot; (or something like that) to be helpful in providing
samples of different alphabet styles. Still, it helps to get used to
an individual's handwriting. It takes longer, but you can improve
reading accuracy by looking through several pages by the same census
enumerator to figure out some words.

Bill
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:12:23 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: William Mills &lt;&gt;
Organization: Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
Subject: Re: Need Help Getting Started ...

In article &lt;3doehg$&gt;,
Bill &amp; Kitti Lauer &lt;&gt; wrote:

&gt;We are trying to locate the family surname--- WESTBELD. We know that
&gt;two brothers came to Amer. around the early 1800's. We have not been
&gt;able to locate the family name in Europe. Could someone help us?

The information that two brother's came to America in the early
1800's is a little vague to begin looking for them in Europe. If this
is the story that's been passed down in the family, it may be a bit
garbled in retelling, so it's best to verify with records.

&gt;have been to AZ to the Morman Temple to review their records, talked
&gt;with relatives, looked at census infor.

The census should give you some good clues. Since 1850, the census
includes birthplace (though typically only the country for foreigners).
Since 1880 the census also includes birthplace of parents. So be sure
to get census records for all members of the family for every
available year (up to 1920 now) - including the brothers and sisters
of your ancestor. Check the earlier censuses, too. You don't get as
many details before 1850, but it does help you identify families in
place and time.
You'll also want to get death certificates and newspaper obituaries
for the Westbelds. These will often give you birthplace and parents
names. County histories from the late 19th century typically include
biographical sketches (vanity bios, since they were paid by
subscribers). These can give more clues as to their origins in Europe.
The previous sources should give a better indication of when the
Westbelds came to the US. Check passenger arrival lists - which are
on microfilm available through the National Archives and LDS Family
History Centers.
Once you've thoroughly covered material in the US, you have a much
better chance of being able to locate the Westbelds in Europe.

Bill
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:16:12 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Rickste465 &lt;&gt;
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject: Re: Carbon Paper

&gt;I was wondering if anyone has found a method to improve legibility of
&gt;carbon copies of typewritten documents.

You might try using a copy machine and using a &quot;dark&quot; setting. I have
noticed at work that occasionally a copy of a document came out more
readable. The contrast changed some and also the paper of the new
copy was whiter.
Rick
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:22:52 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Jim Gordon &lt;&gt;
Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY
Subject: Re: Census Records

wrote about Colonial and Victoria census
takers handwriting and the moderator added this:
&gt;
&gt;[ It's less amusing to pose this question, but anyone have any good
&gt; references on reading old-style handwriting? -Mod. ]

I do believe I've seen some guides to understanding Colonial
penmanship, but the easiest way to learn is get hold of some printed
New England (MA, ME) vital records and then consult the microfilm of
the same records at a state archives or an LDS FHC or historical
/genealogical society. But is short, an illustration of proper
penmanship is not a foolproof guide to interpreting handwriting. How
many of received detailed instruction in the early years and our
current handwriting bears absolutely no resemblance to what we had
drilled into us!! Practically speaking the best teacher for
interpreting Colonial and Victorian handwriting is experience. What at
first looks like hen-scratching becomes quite legible after you pore
over enough manuscipt materials. Believe me, I've had a few headaches,
myself.

Happy Rooting &amp; Happy New Year

-
JIM GORDON
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:27:52 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Jim Gordon &lt;&gt;
Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY
Subject: Re: Carbon Paper

(Scott McGee) wrote:
&gt;
&gt;I was wondering if anyone has found a method to improve legibility of
&gt;carbon copies of typewritten documents. My grandfather took many notes
&gt;and seems to have made carbon copies of each. I have some in my possesion,
&gt;but find some of them VERY hard to read. Only think I have found so far
&gt;is the old &quot;eye strain&quot; method. conbined with cross-referencing with
&gt;other stuff to sort out the things I still can't read for sure.

Perhaps you might try photographing the material and then having a
reverse print made (i.e white on black). As an addendum, I recently
saw a posting on some photo software in which the person mentioned
they were able to enhance old photos by rephotographing them and
sending the film to Seattle Film Works who put them on a floppy for
processing by the software.

Happy Rooting &amp; Happy New Year
-
JIM GORDON
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:32:43 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Jim Gordon &lt;&gt;
Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY
Subject: Re: Military Service

(Robert Marshall) wrote:
&gt;
&gt;In &lt;3cvbid$&gt; Clara Nistler &lt;&gt;
&gt;writes:
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;Where can a person write to verify tour of duty in the US Navy? I'm
&gt;&gt;researching deceased relative who served during the VietNam war. Any
&gt;&gt;help will be appreciated. Thanks!
&gt;
&gt;Records for the Viet Nam War are ONLY available to the person who
&gt;served, their spouse, and immediate children.
&gt;
&gt;As to a source, try the National Archives. They have a listing for
&gt;where to write for what records. I cannot remember off the top of my
&gt;head where to write to, nor do I have my list at hand.

The National Archives General Information Leaflet Number 7 (Rev 1985)
&quot;Military Service Records in the National Archives of the United
States&quot; is available from the NARA, Washgton, DC 20408. It is a
complete guide to military records.

Military records after WW1 (generally-see leaflet for details) are
available from the National Personnel Records Center (MPRC) 9700 Page
Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63132.

Might I suggest that if the records for a relative are releasable only
to the immediate family, then ask somebody in the immediate family to
request the records! Of course, if there are no immediate family
members surviving, state that in your request.

-
JIM GORDON
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:36:42 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Jim Gordon &lt;&gt;
Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY
Subject: Re: Drafts in Sterling from US

&quot;T. Phelps&quot; &lt;&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;I recently received a reply to a request for copies of records held in
&gt;England. Naturally enough the request was for payment in Sterling.
&gt;The amount is small, about $14. My local bank wants $17 (the customer
&gt;rate!) to issue a Sterling draft. I expect to have to pay some kind
&gt;of premium, but $17 a this seems a bit high. At that price, my
&gt;foreign research will come to a screeching halt.
&gt;
&gt;What methods have others used to pay for material where foreign
&gt;currency is requested?

Check with handy dandy local US Post Office. They have International
Money Orders available. Never deal with your local bank (or the local
airport money exchange) when it comes to international currency
dealings. They'll rip you off every time because it's a low frequency
/high premium business. If you expect to do a bit of business with
British firms, it might be worth your while to write to a NY or DC
branch of a major UK bank and establish an overseas account with
them. See you local public librarian for info on addresses, etc.

-
JIM GORDON
X-Message:
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 1994 18:39:37 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Jim Craft &lt;&gt;
Organization: G &amp; A Technical Software, Inc.
Subject: Re: Carbon Paper

On 27 Dec 1994 Scot &lt;&gt; wrote

&gt;I was wondering if anyone has found a method to improve legibility of
&gt;carbon copies of typewritten documents. My grandfather took many notes
&gt;and seems to have made carbon copies of each. I have some in my possesion,
&gt;but find some of them VERY hard to read. Only think I have found so far
&gt;is the old &quot;eye strain&quot; method. conbined with cross-referencing with other
&gt;stuff to sort out the things I still can't read for sure.

You might try scanning one and twiddling with the controls in the
software to enhance it. If you are able to obtain a good copy, you
can attempt some OCR (optical character recognition) software to
save them in the computer as text (or what ever).

Just a thought!

Jim

--
Jim Craft
Disclaimer: &quot;Maybe all I need besides my pills and the surgery
is a new metaphor for reality&quot; -- Dis con nec ted
Queensryche, Promised Land (1994)
X-Message:
Date: Wed, 28 Dec 1994 23:14:43 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Jim Gordon &lt;&gt;
Organization: Prodigy Services Company 1-800-PRODIGY
Subject: VIRUS Alert!! (, exp)

On 25 or 26 December, I accidentally saved two articles to my hard
disk, rather than to floppy as I usually do. One from here (Scott
McGee's &quot;Treasure Trove!&quot;) and one from alt.genealogy (Jane Bergen's
&quot;Family Tree Mkr - help!!&quot;). As a result of one of these two
downloads, I picked up a virus called &quot;AntiEXE&quot; which infects the
memory area in the boot sector and essentially screws up (at least on
my machine) the 32-bit access for Windows. Microsoft Anti-Virus cannot
detect it! I found it with Norton's AV and corrected it.

This is a general heads-up for everyone. I understand you can't get a
virus from reading, only downloading. So heads-up.

==============================================================
ATTN: An aside to the moderator, I noted a couple of days ago on one
of the computer BBS that some people were having problems with 32-bit
Windows access and they weren't having any success in figuring out
what was going on. I don't have any interest in Symantec, but NAV
detected the virus and MSAV did not!!!
==============================================================

So, Scott, if you're experiencing problems, that may be the cause. I'm
NOT, REPEAT NOT, saying that I got the virus from you or Jane -- it
could have come from the either BB. And it had to be on the 25th or
the 26th because that's the only time I downloaded anything.

-
JIM GORDON
X-Message:
Date: Wed, 28 Dec 1994 23:53:15 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
From:
Organization: RAND Corporation
Subject: Re: VIRUS Alert!! (, exp)

Jim Gordon () wrote:

: On 25 or 26 December, I accidentally saved two articles to my hard
: disk, rather than to floppy as I usually do. One from here (Scott
: McGee's &quot;Treasure Trove!&quot;) and one from alt.genealogy (Jane Bergen's
: &quot;Family Tree Mkr - help!!&quot;). As a result of one of these two
: downloads, I picked up a virus called &quot;AntiEXE&quot; which infects the
: memory area in the boot sector and essentially screws up (at least on
: my machine) the 32-bit access for Windows. Microsoft Anti-Virus cannot
: detect it! I found it with Norton's AV and corrected it.

Usually, _executing_ a file is necessary for a virus infection to
occur. Simply downloading a file is generally safe (at least on
MS-DOS boxes).

&quot;Treasure Trove&quot;, at least in the form it left rand.org, was a
completely harmless file. &quot;Family Tree Mkr - help!!&quot; has expired
on my NNTP server and I can't easily check it.

: This is a general heads-up for everyone. I understand you can't get a
: virus from reading, only downloading. So heads-up.

Actually, the old saw &quot;you can't get a virus from reading&quot; is misleading.
So far as I know you can't get a virus, but it is possible to embed
things in a standard 7-bit ASCII file that can cause substantial harm
(as in format the hard drive, for example) on a MS-DOS box under
certain circumstances. Cheers, B.

----------
Dr. Brian Leverich
Information Systems Scientist, The RAND Corporation
Co-moderator, soc.genealogy.methods/GENMTD-L

X-Message:
Date: Wed, 28 Dec 1994 23:56:02 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: William Mills &lt;&gt;
Organization: Stanford University, CA 94305, USA
Subject: Re: Drafts in Sterling from US

In article &lt;3doeub$&gt;,
T. Phelps &lt;&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;What methods have others used to pay for material where foreign
&gt;currency is requested?
&gt;
From soc.roots/roots-l last spring:

Newsgroups: soc.roots
Message-ID: &lt;&gt;
Date: Sat, 23 Apr 1994 08:04:30 -0400
Sender: ROOTS-L Genealogy List &lt;&gt;
From: Bill Allen &lt;&gt;
Subject: Sending money overseas

I have had excellent results using Ruesch International. They charge
$2.00 plus the rate of exchange for a check. Usually they want you to
send them the agreed upon amount and they will send you a check
immediately.

They are in Washington, DC, but their phone number is 800-424-2923

As treasurer of an international genealogy organization, they even sent
me the check before they received my money. This involved having an
&quot;account&quot; with them, and establishing a code number.

Never had a problem.

As opposed to Canada, it seems that US institutions are not organized
to do business in foreign exchange for us little people.

Now to find the money for everything I want to send for.

Bill

Bill Allen, 4883 Delevan Drive, Lyndhurst OH 44124
X-Message:
Date: Wed, 28 Dec 1994 23:59:10 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Lori Bushman &lt;&gt;
Organization: HolliCom Internet Services
Subject: Use of Computers in County Offices

I'm looking for some information about the use of computers in county
offices. Specifically, I want to know if there are any county health
departments or clerk's offices which enter birth, marriage, or death
records into a computer.

I live in Indiana and have been to several county offices here, as well
as several others in Illinois, Ohio, and Tennessee. I have not yet found
one office which utilizes a computer for genealogical records.

Does anyone know if there are statutes which prevent offices from moving
away from the enormous record books?

Any comments are welcome.

Lori Bushman

X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 00:01:51 PST
Reply-To: YVONNEFITZ &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: YVONNEFITZ &lt;&gt;
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject: Italy what did you do that worked?

My search will soon bring to Italy ( just got to find the addresses to
write to find birth, marrage and death certificate). I have found a
co-worker who can read and write italian to help with the letters.

I would like help from people who have done this before so I can learn
form their mistake.

Thank you any and all help :).
Regards,
Yvonne FitzGerald


@-&gt;-&gt;-&gt;----- (a rose)
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 00:04:39 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From:
Organization: The American University, Washington DC
Subject: Re: Help locating a 13-yr old female in 1900

&gt; The 1900 MA census lists the family of Hyman FINE with an _extra_
&gt; daughter. This girl is listed as Rose FINE, a daughter, b Sep 1886,
&gt; Russia; immigrated in 1888. The problem is: the family is next found in
&gt; Denver in 1902 without this daughter. None of the children ever mentioned
&gt; her (this was a complete surprise when I found her in the MA census
&gt; record).

Guess what: the census takers were not perfect. I caught them
calling guests in the household, goofed up relationships, etc. They
may be right this time, but don't bet the farm on it.

-Jim Cobbs
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 00:08:17 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: William Albert Davis &lt;&gt;
Organization: IgLou Internet Services
Subject: Re: KY obituary search?

The main depository of Kentucky Newspapers is the University of
Kentucky, and a great project of tracing and microfilming papers was
completed a few years back. I don't know what is available as far as
copying services. You might send a query to
--
Bill Davis
****************************************************************************
William A. Davis * * P.O.Box 337 * Ghent * KY * 41045
****************************************************************************
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 00:11:38 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: John Sankey &lt;&gt;
Organization: The National Capital FreeNet, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Subject: Re: Census Records

One of my great uncles took a rural census once, and had stories
to tell about it for the rest of his life. First, the time for
Canadian census at the time was 1 April, when roads were about
30% deeply rutted ice, 30% knee-deep mud, 30% furious dogs, and
10% farmers with pitchforks who were convinced that census takers
were tax spies. Takers stood in the mud outside the door trying
to write everything down in indelible ink on a form designed
with great care to be too large to hang onto in the wind, rain,
or whatever else was happening on the legally-required day,
while one member of the family (usually a child) verbally
relayed wildly-fragmentary details of everyone in or out of the
house in every possible order but a logical one (I wish I had
tape recorded some of the juxtapositions of data that he used
to tell of!). In Quebec's Eastern Townships, there were only
two common languages, but in some parts of the prairies there
would be a dozen, in fact just about any language spoken at that
latitude anywhere around the world. Of course every religion
had it's specific designation designed to overflow any census
column ever invented and woe betide any enumerator who wrote
down anything that could conceivably be interpreted as referring
to any other variant of the denomination involved (Methodists
and Presbyterians seem to have been particularly divisive in
that regard back then)....

Anyway, THAT'S why we can't read that writing now!
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 00:16:34 PST
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Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Griff Evans &lt;&gt;
Organization: On-Ramp; Individual Internet Connections; Dallas/Ft Worth/Houston,
TX USA
Subject: Re: Carbon Paper

In article &lt;3dpeov$&gt;, says...
&gt;
&gt;I was wondering if anyone has found a method to improve legibility of
&gt;carbon copies of typewritten documents. My grandfather took many notes
&gt;and seems to have made carbon copies of each. I have some in my possesion,
&gt;but find some of them VERY hard to read. Only think I have found so far
&gt;is the old &quot;eye strain&quot; method. conbined with cross-referencing with other
&gt;stuff to sort out the things I still can't read for sure.
&gt;
&gt;Scott

I seem to remember from back in the dark ages of typewriters,
etc. that carbon paper also came in different colors. If blue is your
color, try photographing it (on B&amp;W film) using a red or dark yellow
filter. This is an old photography trick to darken blue skies in B&amp;W
photos.

It's a real pain, but if you're desparate, you might resort to
reflective infra-red photography. This is a trick the FBI used to use
to detect altered documents. Again, this is a B&amp;W film, but it's an
absolute nightmare to use. You even have to load your camera in a
darkroom.

Kodak used to have a book on IR photography -- check large libraries
or even larger camera stores.

As a last resort, find a teenager to read them for you. :-)

Griff

X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 07:56:14 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Olivia4695 &lt;&gt;
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject: Historic Warrior Run Church, Northumberland Co. PA

I was given the name of Historic Warrior Run Church in Turbotsville, PA as
a library. I have written and never received a reply. I'm looking for an
ancestor baptism and there is a good chance it is there.

Does anyone know if it is a library, historical society, or a church? Any
idea who might have a copy of their records in the 1830-1850 range?

Thanks
Janet Welty
(Olivia4695AOL
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 08:01:41 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Brendan Braybrook &lt;&gt;
Subject: bay city, mich.

I am planning a brief visit to Bay City soon.
Any tips on where to ffind genealogical resources.
thanx.

-----------------
-=- Brendan Braybrook -=-
-----------------
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 08:07:33 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Tim Philipp &lt;&gt;
Organization: United States Patent and Trademark Office
Subject: Researching Swiss Surnames

Here are some books that I think are essential for researching Swiss
ancestors.

There is a book that is on microfisch and available at any LDS FHL.
This was a book that indexes Swiss surnames and gives locations and
dates where that name existed in thatlocation. The microfilm number
is 6053507. I was just at the Library of Congress on Saturday and I
saw almost the same type of book but was newer. It was three volumes
and the title was in 5 languages. In english it was _The Origin of
Swiss Surnames_ .

Another book that I wrote about on the net is called
_Familiengeschichtliche Bibliographie der Schweiz_ by Mario von Moos,
Camden, ME : Picton Press, 1993. I also looked at this book at the
Library of Congress and wrote my thoughts on it on the net. You can
buy this book from Olde Springfielf Shoppe P.O. Box 171 Elverson, PA
19520-0171. Telephone: (610) 286-0258 They want $63. I wouldn't buy
it but I would try to get a FHC to buy it or get it through
interlibrary loan. You must however look at it because it has over
10,000 surnames and a Town register that tell what families are in
each town. Remember though that this book is a bibliography of Swiss
genealogies so it is just contains citations of published genealogies
and the researcher. The published genealogies may only be found in an
archive in switzerland or may be in the US libraries. In my case they
are in Switzerland so I am trying to contact the person that did the
research and he may send me a copy or I don't know what.

There is another volume of 8 books that I saw at the Library of
Congress. They have a set written in German and a set written in
French that I saw. The title that I wrote in my notes is
_Dictionnaire historique &amp; biographique de la Suisse. DQ51 .D5 This
was a great source of information about Swiss locations and many swiss
familie biographies. There are also helpful maps and interesting art
and cultural information. I would have named this book Encyclopedia ...
I just wish that there was set in English.

Regards,

Tim Philipp
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 08:16:06 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Denis Beauregard &lt;&gt;
Organization: Institut de recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Canada
Subject: Re: VIRUS Alert!! (, exp)

Note the followup line: this thread belongs to computing, not methods.

Please note it is absolutely not possible to get a virus thru an
article. At most, if there was a program attached to it (with the
Fido technology, it is possible to attach a program to a message,
but not with Usenet), or if there was some binary uuencoded.

I understand there was a similar virus alert recently from someone
who said the same thing, but it was no more than coincidence (someone
who got a virus the first time s/he was connected to a network)...

In article &lt;3dtnio$&gt;
(Jim Gordon) writes:
&gt;
&gt;On 25 or 26 December, I accidentally saved two articles to my hard
&gt;disk, rather than to floppy as I usually do. One from here (Scott
&gt;McGee's &quot;Treasure Trove!&quot;) and one from alt.genealogy (Jane Bergen's
&gt;&quot;Family Tree Mkr - help!!&quot;). As a result of one of these two
&gt;downloads, I picked up a virus called &quot;AntiEXE&quot; which infects the
&gt;memory area in the boot sector and essentially screws up (at least on
&gt;my machine) the 32-bit access for Windows. Microsoft Anti-Virus cannot
&gt;detect it! I found it with Norton's AV and corrected it.
&gt;
&gt;This is a general heads-up for everyone. I understand you can't get a
&gt;virus from reading, only downloading. So heads-up.

You're wrong: you can't get a virus by downloading a message.
But in some specific cases, if you download a file including an
executable program, then it is possible.

Concerning using email, here is one possibility: if you use an
offline reader (like a .QWK file) and the .QWK file contains a
.exe file that replaces a file on your computer (this would means
[1] a very intelligent virus at the BBS site or the BBS that voluntarily
put the .exe inside the .QWK file, and [2] the decompressor program
did not warn you about overwriting an existing .exe or .com or someother
file. Not usual as a good offline reader will use its own download
directory to avoid this.

If I may suggest something to the genealogy communauty: when
uploading softwares, use a .zip, .arj and other compressed format,
never .exe auto-extract. Reason is with a .zip or other, the internal
of the file is very hard to modify, but with .exe it is quite easier.

--
Ce message represente uniquement l'opinion de son auteur et
n'engage en aucune facon son employeur.
Denis Beauregard Internet:
Programmez avec de la classe: essayez le C++
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 08:19:43 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Neil Dowlin &lt;&gt;
Subject: Re: Carbon Paper

In article &lt;3dqhnc$&gt;,
(Rickste465) says:

&gt;&gt;I was wondering if anyone has found a method to improve legibility of
&gt;&gt;carbon copies of typewritten documents.

&gt;You might try using a copy machine and using a &quot;dark&quot; setting. I have
&gt;noticed at work that occasionally a copy of a document came out more
&gt;readable. The contrast changed some and also the paper of the new
&gt;copy was whiter. &gt;Rick

You might try plastic sheets used for report binders and sheet
protectors. For instance, light yellow works on many hotel receipts
written on carbonless and carbonized multi-part forms. Try also light
blue and light red-pink as welllight green. It works kinda like a
photo-filter. Many copiers are blind to certain colors.
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 12:36:13 PST
Reply-To: PHNX &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: PHNX &lt;&gt;
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject: Re: Searching in VT &amp; Que.

I am searching for information (birth dates, death dates, marriage date)
for the parents of Moses Onesimus Hamel. The parents listed on his death
certificate are Onesimus Hamel &amp; Adlade Forest. The birthplace listed for
Moses was Danville, PQ on December 26, 1854. Any information or hints on
where to look would be greatly appreciated.
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 13:57:45 PST
Reply-To:
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: &quot;Larry D. Kohout&quot; &lt;&gt;
Organization: Network Systems Corporation
Subject: Seeking Systematizer Source

Does anyone know of a good book that discusses alternates and methods
for organizing, tracking and storing genealogical records?

Over the years I have collected records, books and photographs that
need to be stored and cross referenced to one another and just about
every system I have tried seems to have more draw-backs than atributes.
Everything has its tradeoffs, but it would be nice to find a source
that lists a number of systems along with their strengths and
weaknesses.

---
Larry Kohout Voice 612-424-1604
Network Systems Corporation FAX 612-424-2853
7600 Boone Ave No. Minneapolis, MN 55428
USA Internet:
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 15:23:19 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Linda Libician &lt;&gt;
Organization: Connection Technologies
Subject: Farms in Norway - Afjord and Jossund

Recently I posted a message that I would search for farm names in my book of
farms for Afjord and Jossund areas of Norway 1801-1875. Here are a list of
the farms. If you are interested in any of the detail for any of these farms,
please do not hesitate to contact me.

Arnevika
Asen
Aseroya
Bakkan
Barset
Berdal
Bratset
Breivoll
Brulia
Butlia
By
Bolsmarka
Bormarka
Balsfjord
Barlia
Dolmseth
Drilen
Eid
Eidem
Finset
Fjellsaunet
Fleinstad
Frones
Gilde
Grimstad
Grotan ved Kvitlan
Halsaunet
Hellesvika
Hestvik
Humstad
Hastad
Imsen
Jossund
Kammen
Karlsaunet
Kjorem
Kroken
Kroksnesset
Kvendal med Bekken
Leset
Lysvatnet
Lysoya
Lysoysund
Lovoya
Madsoya
Mandal
Mo
Momyr
Monstad
Morken
Morkenes
Morvoll
Maelan
Molsetta
More
Moreaunet
Naustan
Nedre Forfot
Nittemarka
Olden
Ommunddal og Storfjellet
Rabban
Rotnesset
Rommen i Jossund
Rommen i A
Ranes
Raken
Selnes
Skansen, lopenr. 42
Skaset
Skjern
Skjoroya
Staven
Strand
Sundet
Teksdal
Tiltrem
Tornes
Torhaug
Ugedal
Valan
Valleraunet
Valsoya
Vasstrand
Vinnan
Oian
Oikaunet
Ovre Forfot
A
Arbo

Hope this helps!
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 18:07:55 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Michael Emery &lt;&gt;
Subject: Black Genealogists Unite

[ Followups on new group formation to soc.genealogy.computing.
Followups on research problems and methods in Black genealogy are
exceedingly welcome in s.g.methods. And, given that the moderator
has already blighted this post with a preface, I'll go ahead and
say that I'll be voting in favor of creating a Black genealogy
newsgroup, too. -Mod. ]

BLACK GENEALOGISTS UNITE (long-play version)

INTRODUCTION
Black genealogists are hard to find on the Internet. This communication
just might help us to better find each other. If we can find each other,
then we can begin to help each other.

Here's the concept: on the Internet, it's difficult to find genealogy
information, leads and resources that are pertinent to African Americans.
Anyone who has spent time looking at US census reports from times past
knows what I mean: in order to find a kernel of relevance, one has to
sift through so very much chaff or information that is clearly not
related to African Americans. And in my afternoon-long encounter with the
Church of Latter Day Saints genealogy section, I found very voluminous
records; but they are also quite impertinent because of a high &quot;noise to
signal&quot; ratio. They just don't have a good concentration of African
American data, which makes the discovery ritual into something of a
struggle. This is no small thing.

As one year pales and the new year begins, now just might be a good
moment for considering some discovery options that exist on the Internet.

BACKGROUND
While browsing the Usenet news group Soc.roots, I discovered the forum is
soon to expire from the Internet, now eclipsed by several newly-formed
groups. David Chapin &lt;&gt; has been serving as the
organizer and coordinator of this recent Internet Genealogy
Reorganization. On Wed, 21 Dec 1994, he wrote:

&gt;&gt;I STRONGLY URGE POSTERS TO THIS GROUP TO MOVE YOUR
POSTS TO ONE OF THE NEW GROUPS NOW!!

soc.genealogy.misc
soc.genealogy.methods
soc.genealogy.surnames
soc.genealogy.computing
soc.genealogy.french
soc.genealogy.german
soc.genealogy.jewish&lt;&lt;

One does not have to be a rocket scientist to sense that *something* has
been left out of this reorg scheme: namely, there's no unique place for
African Americans to co-mingle for genealogical data swapping.

Attempting to project my eagerness in participating in the process of
group formation, I voiced my desire for the consideration of such a group
in David Chapin's Soc.roots discussion thread, &quot;All soc.roots subscribers
please read!&quot; Ultimately came responses from several folks, indicating
that I'm not the only African American who would like to see a genealogy
news group focused on *our* needs. The most recent response was from
Vaughn Rhoden &lt;&gt;. Rhoden did not offer any ethnic
identity on 29 Dec 1994, when he wrote:

ME&gt;&gt;Is there any interest beyond my own for perhaps
a &quot;soc.genealogy.african american&quot; group?&lt;&lt;

VR&gt;&gt;Seems logical. I am kind of surprised it hasn't
already been done.&lt;&lt;

However, first to respond was Margaret J. Olson
&lt;&gt;. As one of David Chapin's reorg committee
members, she was privy to much of the internal discussion, as well as
input from the genealogy-user community. It seems that there was no major
effort to be responsive to the desires of black genealogists. On Mon, Dec
26, 1994. Olson stated:

&gt;&gt;During the discussion phase of the reorganization
of soc.roots into soc.genealogy.***, one person did
suggest a desire for an African American group.
I did not keep her name, but since the group
creation passed its vote, I have been collecting
the names of people who support different &quot;ethno&quot;
groups in the hopes of providing names to anyone
who comes forward with a charter and proposal for
any new group.&lt;&lt;

Olson also voiced her hopes that the genealogy groups scheme that's been
adopted by the reorg committee will be adequate and satisfying:

&gt;&gt;Until someone does start an African American group, by
all means see if there is some way to make good use
of the groups we have--I think the soc.genealogy.methods
group has great possibilities for everyone. Ask your
surnames questions in .surnames, but ask and answer in
.methods. You may get others to reply--and you may be
able to inform others about methods and problems the rest
of us never thought about.&lt;&lt;

AN INTERNET SOLUTION FOR BLACK GENEALOGISTS
There is profound security in the notion that a black genealogist might
find some productive worth in the Soc.genealogy.*** news groups that will
survive the official reorganization. After he or she has pushed the
threshold of discover back to level of affinity with Anglo-Americans,
there will be an acknowledged need to consult with the German or French
side of the family. Nonetheless, there are some folks who seem bent on an
African American section on the Net.

Stanley Cosper Sr., &lt;&gt;, and James M.
Loadholt Jr. all expressed their specific desire to see an Af-American
genealogy group on the Internet. As &lt;&gt; put
it on Wed, 28 Dec 94:

&gt;&gt;I would be extremely interested a
soc.genealogy.african american group.&lt;&lt;

It just might require all of our efforts to see such a thing
through--perhaps especial effort from the enigmatic
&lt;&gt;, who lists his organization as the NASA
Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. It would not be a bad
thing, methinks, having a rocket scientist on one's side! &lt;&gt;:)

On Tue, Dec 27, 1994, Saundra Brown &lt;&gt; told me that she
had formerly attempted to suggest an Soc.genealogy.african american group
to the Genealogy Reorganization Committee, but got an unfavorable,
unsupportive message back. This is her reaction:

&gt;&gt;I still say that there should be this division
since the others believe that we are not a strong
force in this country. [...] They did not think it
necessary to subdivide.&lt;&lt;

Brown is Vice President of Genealogy at PatriciaLiddell Researchers,
Chicago Chapter, Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc.
I'm not real sure what that means, but I think it means that she is one
serious and professional person when it comes to genealogy. Dealing with
genealogical matters daily, as she must do, would no doubt lead one to
welcome any kind of convenient tool for facilitating the discovery
process.

Alicia E. Towster &lt;&gt; is not, I suspect, a black genealogist or
anything else black. While serving on the reorg committee, she worked
towards implementing the group that she was interested in, and did not
pay too much attention to peripheral concerns. On Wed, Dec 28, 1994, she
nonetheless provided a hopeful message:

&gt;&gt;[There] *is* interest in this [African American genealogy
group] and some of the interested people have been in
communication with the reorg committee [...] what it
takes is some volunteers to write a group charter and
steer it through the group creation process - this
involves some bureaucracy, but the reorg committee is
prepared to help any new groups through the hurdles.&lt;&lt;

William Mills &lt;&gt; also responded on 28 Dec 1994,
and provided some practical advice on how one might proceed in order to
create a black genealogy news group:

&gt;&gt;First step is to collect the names of interested
participants. [...] Then you'll want to come up
with a name and draft a charter. [...] The working
group that drafted the soc.genealogy
reorganization proposal can provide some advice
in submitting your Request for Discussion (RFD)
to news.announce.new groups and bringing it to a
successful vote.&lt;&lt;

I conclude that the opportunity for African Americans to create a
discrete Internet domain for genealogical communications is not something
that will just happen by itself; it will not be given to us. Rather, this
is a prize that will come about through the efforts of those who seek it.
The bandwidth is there.

TWO E-MAIL SOLUTIONS: AAGENE-L and ROOTS-L
Margaret J. Olson also suggested that one such as myself might choose to
subscribe to a new discussion group called AAGENE-L. AAGENE-L stands for
&quot;African American Genealogy Moderated Mail List,&quot; and is sponsored by
Mike Wade and the U-People BBS in Mansfield, Ohio. Some folks might be
inclined to study the following instructions for subscribing: send e-mail
to &lt;&gt; and write &quot;SUBSCRIBE&quot; without the quote marks
in the Subject field; no actual message is required.

Saundra Brown recommends and subscribes to ROOTS-L, a genealogy
listserver. This nets her some 1000 lines of information every day.
According to the Soc.roots FAQ:

&gt;&gt;ROOTS-L is an Email based discussion list where
those who have an interest in Genealogy may
communicate via Email messages in hopes of
finding more family history information. This
discussion list used to be gatewayed to the Usenet
news group Soc.Roots, the intention being that
all messages sent directly to ROOTS-L would also
appear in Soc.Roots, and vice versa. However, this
'linking' has been now been disabled and the two
groups are going their own ways.&lt;&lt;

We now know that news group Soc.roots is going the way of the dodo bird.
According to the FAQ, you may subscribe to the ROOTS-L mailing list by
sending an e-mail message to &lt;&gt; with the following
one line as the only text of the message:

SUBSCRIBE ROOTS-L firstname lastname

For your effort, IMHO, you get to sift through much chaff...

BACK TO THE INTERNET: BLACK GENEALOGISTS UNITE
So, perhaps the future will see us hashing it out over AAGENE-L. The
advantage of an e-mail discussion group, like both AAGENE-L and ROOTS-L,
is that e-mail service is probably more ubiquitous than Internet
accounts. The downside is that listservers are somewhat exclusive. That
is, they are not immediately obvious to people who don't know that they
exist and who don't make the effort to learn of their existence;
therefore, some people will *never* know they exist. This communication
might help some folks find their way into those two listservers.

The advantage of a Usenet discussion group is that it's very public and
open. Lurkers may contribute at any time, and that contribution just
might prove to be a timely and valuable one. However IMHO, the major
liability of Soc.roots (or Soc.genealogy.*** groups) is that the
requisite Internet accounts for maintaining a healthy synergy are
probably not sufficient in number vis-a-vis African American Net surfers.
Moreover, users of online services--for instance America Online, which
has its own internal genealogy discussion area--might not be so ambitious
as to *test* the surf of the Net for another kind of fish or genealogy
discussion group. But this might be my own false perception; we all know
that the Net is growing in population at a very swift rate.

At any rate, this discourse has been cross-posted to several areas; but
this writer is demure at the thought of posting to news groups
soc.genealogy.french, soc.genealogy.german, and soc.genealogy.jewish:

soc.genealogy.misc
soc.genealogy.methods
soc.genealogy.computing
soc.roots (soon leaving behind a fine name for a future group?)
AAGENE-L
America Online (Clubs &amp; Interests: Genealogy Forum: Genealogy
Message Center: People, Places, and Times: African American)

I hope that this communication serves some good; may the mud settle back
to the bottom. If you are so moved, please feel free to make contact with
me in your most convenient style, short of violence etcetera. BTW, I do
not intend to subscribe to ROOTS-L. If there is a will to share our
genealogical pursuits with each other, then there is more than one way to
go about it. There are some options.

Michael Emery looking for &gt;&lt; Cabin
Austin TX peace &gt;&lt; Davis
&lt;&gt; love &gt;&lt; Emery
&amp; prosperity &gt;&lt; Morris
in the new year &gt;&lt; Shandy
X-Message:
Date: Thu, 29 Dec 1994 18:12:19 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Scott McGee &lt;&gt;
Organization: Microware Systems Corp., Des Moines, Iowa
Subject: Re: VIRUS Alert!!

Jim Gordon reports some problems discovered after download some
articles (one of which was mine). [Original text below my reply]

Jim,
First, I find it highly unlikely that you would actually become infected
by a virus by downloading a USENET article which is just text. I will NOT
say it is impossible, but it highly unlikely.

Second, since I do not own or use a PC compatible computer, it is not at
all likely that such problems could have originated here anyway. I read
this newsgroup on my Sun 4 Sparcstation 1+ at work (the company is called
Microware, not Microwave), and it runs unix.

Third, sorry to hear you were affected by a virus. I hope nothing valuable
was lost.

Scott

&gt;On 25 or 26 December, I accidentally saved two articles to my hard
&gt;disk, rather than to floppy as I usually do. One from here (Scott
&gt;McGee's &quot;Treasure Trove!&quot;) and one from alt.genealogy (Jane Bergen's
&gt;&quot;Family Tree Mkr - help!!&quot;). As a result of one of these two
&gt;downloads, I picked up a virus called &quot;AntiEXE&quot; which infects the
&gt;memory area in the boot sector and essentially screws up (at least on
&gt;my machine) the 32-bit access for Windows. Microsoft Anti-Virus cannot
&gt;detect it! I found it with Norton's AV and corrected it.
&gt;
&gt;This is a general heads-up for everyone. I understand you can't get a
&gt;virus from reading, only downloading. So heads-up.
&gt;
&gt;==============================================================
&gt;ATTN: An aside to the moderator, I noted a couple of days ago on one
&gt;of the computer BBS that some people were having problems with 32-bit
&gt;Windows access and they weren't having any success in figuring out
&gt;what was going on. I don't have any interest in Symantec, but NAV
&gt;detected the virus and MSAV did not!!!
&gt;==============================================================
&gt;
&gt;So, Scott, if you're experiencing problems, that may be the cause. I'm
&gt;NOT, REPEAT NOT, saying that I got the virus from you or Jane -- it
&gt;could have come from the either BB. And it had to be on the 25th or
&gt;the 26th because that's the only time I downloaded anything.
&gt;
&gt;-
&gt; JIM GORDON
&gt;
&gt;
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 08:12:59 PST
Reply-To:
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Larry Autry &lt;&gt;
Organization: Silicon Graphics, St. Louis, MO
Subject: Native American from Tennessee.

&gt;From anecdotal information, our family has reason to believe that
our great-grandmother (born in the mid 1800s) was Indian. All we
know is her first name but it's apparently an Anglicized nickname
(Maggie) rather than a true American Indian name. They were
married in Tennessee. If I can locate their marraige record,
where should I go for more information on her?

Thanks,

--
Larry Autry

Regional Services Engineer
North American Technical Assistance
Silicon Graphics Inc., St. Louis, MO (In the HEART of North America)
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 08:16:22 PST
Reply-To: Elizabeth O'Driscoll &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Elizabeth O'Driscoll &lt;&gt;
Organization: The National Capital FreeNet
Subject: Help:How to research a surname in Toronto

I live in Ottawa and want to do some research into my family's roots &amp;
relatives who reside(d) in the Toronto area.

What is the best way to do this. Can I do it by computer or do I have
to send letters to wherever.

eliz
please reply to me() thanks
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 08:19:14 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Bjorn Myrstad &lt;&gt;
Organization: SINTEF DELAB, Trondheim, Norway.
Subject: Re: Farms in Norway - Afjord and Jossund

My Father-in-law came from the Morken farm, and I have access to the
same bygdeb|ker at the public library. I may also assist if someone
needs help with these farms.

--Vennlig hilsen / Kind regards

Bj|rn Myrstad
Aksel Nilsens vei 43
N-7038 Trondheim
Norway
Phone: +47 73 962582
Email:
Researching: MYRSTAD/MORKEN/ANDERSEN/HOEL
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 08:24:25 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Ken Healy &lt;&gt;
Organization: The National Capital FreeNet
Subject: Re: Searching in VT &amp; Que.

In a previous posting, PHNX () writes:
&gt; I am searching for information (birth dates, death dates, marriage date)
&gt; for the parents of Moses Onesimus Hamel. The parents listed on his death
&gt; certificate are Onesimus Hamel &amp; Adlade Forest. The birthplace listed for
&gt; Moses was Danville, PQ on December 26, 1854. Any information or hints on
&gt; where to look would be greatly appreciated.

The following would be a good place to start. They can direct you.

Quebec Family History Society
P.O. Box 1026
Pointe Claire, Quebec
H9S 4H9

You might also contact the following which covers the county where
Danville is located:

Richmond County Historical Society
Richmond, Quebec
J0B 2H0

Good luck searching from an ex-Danvillian

Ken Healy
--
Ken Healy
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 08:27:37 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: bob doerr &lt;&gt;
Organization: UMR Missouri's Technological University
Subject: Re: Use of Computers in County Offices

Lori Bushman () wrote:

: I'm looking for some information about the use of computers in county
: offices. Specifically, I want to know if there are any county health
: departments or clerk's offices which enter birth, marriage, or death
: records into a computer.

: Any comments are welcome.
:

I contend that we taxpayers should enjoy the advantages of technology
in governmental offices, but that great care must be taken for the
safety of computerized records.

I contend that we genealogists should gain enhanced access to records
in governmental offices, via technology.

Each data record should be dated, and should be immediately available
for public browsing, or available the day the record turns age 72 in
the case of births and other 'sensitive' data.

A way to do all this is to install a terminal in a public area of the
local courthouse. On-line data would be good, too.

In any case, computerization must not be used to block public access
to records or to make it mandatory to go thru a governmental employee
to obtain data.

In a non-governmental case, a cemetery computerized its records and,
of the three records that I have checked, two were entered
incompletely and one not at all. My point: We who need access to
records must insist that text-data entry be complete (In the near
future, I expect that both text entries and image scans will be saved
in computer systems.) and that the software provide for public access.

Bob Doerr in the beautiful Mo. Ozarks
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 12:49:44 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Kim Straight 719-599-1585 &lt;&gt;
Subject: Re: Use of Computers in County Offices

[ This post is a good reminder that most responses in s.g.methods ought
to be in public, because other readers may be interested ... -Mod. ]

Lori,

I would be interested in knowing what kind of response you receive to
the post below. Thanks!

Kim Straight


&gt; I'm looking for some information about the use of computers in county
&gt; offices. Specifically, I want to know if there are any county health
&gt; departments or clerk's offices which enter birth, marriage, or death
&gt; records into a computer.
&gt;
&gt; I live in Indiana and have been to several county offices here, as well
&gt; as several others in Illinois, Ohio, and Tennessee. I have not yet found
&gt; one office which utilizes a computer for genealogical records.
&gt;
&gt; Does anyone know if there are statutes which prevent offices from moving
&gt; away from the enormous record books?
&gt;
&gt; Lori Bushman
&gt;
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 12:56:09 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: &quot;Stuart P. Derby&quot; &lt;&gt;
Organization: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
Subject: Farms in Norway?? (was Re: Farms in Norway - Afjord and Jossund)

(Linda Libician) writes:
&gt;
&gt;Recently I posted a message that I would search for farm names in my book of
&gt;farms for Afjord and Jossund areas of Norway 1801-1875. Here are a list of
&gt;the farms. If you are interested in any of the detail for any of these farms,
[ List of farms deleted ]

I've got Norwegian ancesters (my paternal grand-mother) and I'm
*just* getting started researching them. At the moment, I've got one
locality (Sortland) and a bunch of names from th 1800-1950. I'm trying
to figure out how to tackle the Norwegian side of things and need some
info...

I'm guessing that a Norwegian farm is a political unit, analogous to
a shire or county? That I need to determine what farm Sortland is in
and what book covers that area? (Not to mention finding someone to
translate..)

Somehow, the expression &quot;farm names&quot; leads me to think otherwise...

-Stu
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Stu Derby |&quot;Mr. Kelsey got into the dirt business in the usual way,
| studying international relations with an emphasis on
Baylor Coll. Med. | Portugese-speaking countries...&quot; WSJ,6/25/93,p.A1,col.4
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 12:59:40 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Tom Camfield &lt;&gt;
Organization: Internet for the Olympic Peninsula
Subject: Really, Really FRUSTRATING!

One of the most frustrating aspects of some e-mail exchanges is
illustrated by the following:

--I post an inquiry concerning a Mabel Somebody, who married a Wilbur
Anybody around 1890 in Lancaster County, Pa. I request any information
at all about Somebodies and Anybodies in that neighborhood around that
time of century.

--I get a reply from someone who has a lot of Somebodies or quite a
few Anybodies, maybe both--but no Mabel or Wilbur. Sorry, I am told.

--I whip back a response: &quot;Perhaps you could send me your Somebodies
and Anybodies. . . and I possibly will be able to connect them to my
family sometime in the near future.&quot;

--And I get NO REPLY. Why? Is it that my &quot;pen-pal&quot; of the moment
can't be bothered because I have provided him/her with no
information. Certainly the reason can't be that he/she actually
believes that if he/she does not personally have my Mabel or Wilbur in
his/her notes that there is no possible connection between these
family lines!!

--My next expedition into the genealogical section of the Seattle
Public Library may well yield numerous Somebodies and Anybodies. But
they will have been rendered meaningless by someone who has
arbitrarily determined, from his/her own narrow point of view, just
what I might be interested in.

As I said, FRUSTRATING!! Especially to those of us who can open up an
entire chapter of new ancestry if provided with the gateway of that
one tiny elusive bit of information.

--
Tom Camfield -
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 13:02:56 PST
Reply-To:
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Ellen Keyne Seebacher &lt;&gt;
Organization: News Administrators 'r' Us
Subject: Re: Native American from Tennessee.

Larry Autry writes:

&gt;From anecdotal information, our family has reason to believe that
&gt;our great-grandmother (born in the mid 1800s) was Indian. All we
&gt;know is her first name but it's apparently an Anglicized nickname
&gt;(Maggie) rather than a true American Indian name. They were
&gt;married in Tennessee. If I can locate their marraige record,
&gt;where should I go for more information on her?

_Ancestry's Guide to Research: Case Studies in American Genealogy_ (a
book I strongly recommend for its thoughtful approach to solving
various types of research problems) has a chapter on &quot;Ethnic
Ancestors&quot; which begins:

There are hundreds of family traditions that include an
obscure relationship to a Cherokee Indian, usually through
a female line....

and follows with eight pages on Cherokee research. At the end, the
authors (who also edited _The Source_, my preferred genealogical
encyclopedia) offer further reading:

Carpenter, Cecelia S. _How to Research American Indian
Bloodlines: a Manual on Indian Genealogical Research_.
South Prairie, WA: Meico Associates, 1984.

Clark, Dick. _Cherokee Ancestor Research_. Modesto, CA:
Holland Printing Co., 1979.

Hill, Edward E. _Guide to Records in the National Archives
Relating to American Indians_. Washington, DC: NARS, 1981.

One of these books should be quite useful in following up such a
family tradition.

If you're interested in the _Guide to Research_ as well, it's:

Cerny, Johni, and Arlene Eakle. _Ancestry's Guide to
Research: Case Studies in American Genealogy_. Salt Lake
City, UT: Ancestry, Inc., 1985. ISBN 0-916489-01-9.

-- __
Ellen Keyne Seebacher \/
X-Message:
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 1994 23:37:53 PST
Reply-To: Dennis Lloyd &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Dennis Lloyd &lt;&gt;
Organization: The National Capital FreeNet
Subject: Scotland

My father-in-law has run into a wall. To keep this brief, he
is in need of an address to write to for info on his ancestors in an
area of Scotland called Selkirk Shire or Selkirkshire.
He has spent long hours over the past two years in the
National Archives of Canada, has travelled the country tracking down
living relatives in Canada, and has made one trip to the British
Isles, so is not looking for a quick fix---he really enjoys the hunt.
He has taken his wife's family back 7 gens, but is stuck on his side.
He has names, birth dates, and immigration dates, and all the
successive family, but is now stumped.
Are there resources to call on in Scotland?
Please reply to me, as he does not have a modem.
Many thanks, Dennis Lloyd.

--
Dennis Lloyd Charter Member | * * *
The Lighten Up Club | WE
Ottawa, Ontario --Life is Too Short | NEVER
Canada to Take Too Seriously| EXPIRE!
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 08:33:47 PST
Reply-To:
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: &quot;Joseph F. Sweet&quot; &lt;&gt;
Subject: Polish Research

Dear Fellow Researchers:
I have been researching my family for about 18 months, but
just started with my Polish line. I will appreciate any help or
suggestions.
My grandmother, Anna Kowalcxyk, the daughter of Kazimierz
Kowalczyk and Eleanor Popiolek was born on July 26, 1891 in Popiolki,
near Lomza. I have not found it on a map, but I understand that it is
a small village with only 200 people. My grandfather, Stanislaw Ciak,
the son of Adam Ciak and Annie Lemansky(?) was born in probably in the
same area since he was a distant relative of my grandmother's. He was
born on May 8, 1888. They both emigrated to the USA through Hamburg
in 1906, but they did not meet until they arrived in Hope Valley, RI.
I have checked records at the LDS without success. I have
sent for his Naturalization record and for both immigration
records. I have also sent a letter in Polish to a parish priest
in Popiolki.
Does anyone recognize these names or places?
Any suggestions for further research?
I am also looking for books about the social
history of the area around Lomza. Any ideas?

--
Joseph F. Sweet

X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 08:37:36 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Wyndell Taylor &lt;&gt;
Organization: NETCOM On-line Communication Services (408 261-4700 guest)
Subject: Really, Really FRUSTRATING!

In article &lt;3e1s9n$&gt;,
(Tom Camfield) wrote:

&gt;
&gt; --And I get NO REPLY. Why? Is it that my &quot;pen-pal&quot; of the moment
&gt; can't be bothered because I have provided him/her with no
&gt; information. Certainly the reason can't be that he/she actually
&gt; believes that if he/she does not personally have my Mabel or Wilbur in
&gt; his/her notes that there is no possible connection between these
&gt; family lines!!

Maybe they are like some contacts that I have had. Although I
know for a fact that they are descendants of some of my ancestors,
when ask about sending some of their family data to include in our
database, and in return we would send them info that they did not
have. The response has been 10 - 0, &quot;Send me all that you have and I
will see if it is what I want.&quot; Needless to say.... neither of us have
the info that we would like to have. Especially when they are off on a
'wild goose hunt' for the wife of this ancestor. The wife's name was
Nancy Jane.. her tombstone has Rachel on it. Real interesting story
behind that. When the stone was put up 45 years after her death by
some grandchildren... the party paying for the stone ask &quot;What was
grandma's name?&quot; Someone said &quot;Rachel&quot;..... so they search for someone
that isn't (or ain't). &lt;G&gt;...

Wyndell....
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 08:41:13 PST
Reply-To: John Holwell &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: John Holwell &lt;&gt;
Organization: The National Capital FreeNet
Subject: Newfoundland and Labrador Roots

SEARCHING YOUR ROOTS IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR, CANADA
---------------------------------------------------------
File compiled by: John Holwell
E-Mail Address:
Latest Revision: 14 Sep 1994
-----------------------------------------

Following is some information on sources of genealogical
information in the provine of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
While I have made every reasonaable attempt to ensure the
accuracy of this file, there may be some errors and certainly
ommisions. Anyone who would like to contribute to this file,
please E-Mail me and I will follow-up with an updated version.
Thanks to all those who have already helped.

For anybody who is doing genealogical research in Newfoundland
and Labrador, and especially for those who live outside the
province, a good first step would be to write the Provincial
Reference and Resourse Library at St. John's asking for any info
they have on the name you are searching. In your letter, include
the community of origin and time frame. Archivists research
several directories, censuses and other sources, all for the cost
of the photocopies. They are quite busy though and there may be
some wait for a response. A good first step nonetheless.

To ensure that the file gets in the hands of those who may use
it, I have been posting it every couple of months to genealogical
boards such as soc.roots and alt.genealogy, as well as some local
boards. I would also like to be able to place the file on a file
server and allow it to be found by such internet search programs
as veronica etc. I would appreciate hearing from anyone who
could assist me in doing this. Thanks.

*** Indicates major changes since last revision, 24 Jun 1994.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

ADDRESSES OF GEGEALOGICAL INFORMATION SOURCES IN NEWFOUNDLAND and
LABRADOR:

Anglican Church of Canada (Archives),
34 Fraser Road, Gander, Nfld.,A1V 2E8
19 King's Bridge Road, St. John's, Nfld., A1C 3K4
311 Millbrook Mall, Corner Brook, Nfld., A2H 2V3

Bay St. George Heritage Association, PO Box 314, Stephenville,
Nfld. A2N 2Z5

Corner Brook City Library, Sir Richard Squires Building, Corner
Brook, Nfld., A2H 6J8

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Health,
Vital Statistics Division, Confederation Building, St.
John's, Nfld., A1C 2C9
Record from 1892 to present. Searchs cost $4.00 per 3 year
period. Certificates cost $10.00.

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Department of Social
Services, Confederation Building, St. John's, Nfld., A1C 2C9

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Registry of Deeds,
Confederation Building, St. John's, Nfld., A1C 2C9 (wills
pre 1832; land records)

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Crown Lands Office,
Howley Building, St. John's (early crown land grants)

MARATIME HISTORY ARCHIVE
Memorial University of Newfoundland,
St. John's, A1C 5S7
Tel: (709) 737-8428
E-Mail:
See under &quot;General Info&quot; below for holdings

MEMORIAL UNIVERSITY FOLKLORE and LANGUAGE ARCHIVE
E-Mail:
The following is an email from Philip Hiscock, Archivist at
the MUNFLA describing in his own words the genealogical resources
available at the Archive.

&quot; Thanks for your note about putting information about
the MUN Folklore and Language Archive (MUNFLA) in your file
on genealogical resources in Newfoundland. We'd be glad to
be included and would appreciate receiving a copy of it.
The sorts of information we have are mainly of two
kinds, neither of which is very helpful to the genealogist
who has already done a lot of research on their family
history. In every case we are bound as well by the
restrictions inherent in the archive's policies generally,
and in individual collections specifically. Users may have
access to certain collections for their own use, but not for
publication without the explicit permission of the people
involved. Publication means all public distribution
including family newsletters, email, radio broadcast and the
more usual methods. Most of our collections have no
specific restrictions, but about 10% of them do.
The first type of information is that based on the
work files of the late Dr E R Seary, whose book _The Family
Names of the Island of Newfoundland you will be familiar
with. In his workfiles, whichtake up about fourteen linear
metres of paper slips filed by family name,are the full
references to the citations given in the book. Included
from time to time are citations not included in the book by
reason of being more recent than the rest. It is
particularly useful for citations found in the &quot;Family
Traditions&quot; paragraphs in the book, where Seary cited
entries as just &quot;MUN History&quot; or &quot;Geog&quot; or &quot;Folklore.&quot;
Using the work slips we can trace a source to a particular
student's name; in many cases we can find the actual paper
written by that student (usually in the period 1966-70).
The second sort of information that can be helpful
to a family history researcher is the large number of local
studies in the archive: collections of folklore of various
sorts from communities all over Newfoundland and Labrador,
and often including short historical introductions. These
are typically based in part on oral history in the
community, and many include short family trees, at least
going back through living memory. Since they are only
rarely based on documentary searches, they only rarely go
back past living memory, and it is for this reason the
seasoned genealogist may find them unsatisfying. (Of course
they weren't written for genealogists.)
We have a research fee structure, the basic part of
which is an hourly rate of twenty-four dollars an hour, on
top of which we charge GST. A typical search through the
Seary collection would take at least two hours, depending on
the size of the family's entry. A typical search through
the other archival materials may take anywhere from a couple
of hours to several days per family, depending on the
locality and the rarity of the name. Some names are
practically unique to a community and searches are fairly
easy.
This summer, 1994, we are closed for renovations,
but we expect by early September to be open for business
again.
Good luck in your own research,
-Philip Hiscock
Archivist, MUNFLA&quot;

-Further reference can be found below to Dr. E.R. Seary's
&quot;Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland&quot;.
-See also mungate.library.mun.ca

*** MUNGATE.LIBRARY.MUN.CA
Mungate is a server on the internet which is accessable by
telneting to mungate.library.mun.ca. For those who do not have
the ability to directly telnet but can access gopher, such as
freenet account holders, search gopherspace using the keyword
&quot;Newfoundland&quot;. Scroll or search the menu items found for
&quot;Connections to Libraries in Newfoundland&quot;; select it and then
you should see &quot;Connect to Memorial University of Newfoundland
&lt;TEL&gt;&quot;. By selecting this one, you'll be telneting to the site.
Login as mungate.
This site offers the ability to search the following
databases using keywords, subject, title, author, place names
etc. and can provide valuable genealogical information.
Particularly useful I've found were the (11) MUN Folklore and
Language Archive (see separate entry) and (13) Newfoundland
Periodical Article Bibliography. While the actual document cannot
be obtained online, a letter via the post to the library should
get you a copy of the desired article(s). Requests for articles
from the MUNFLA may be made via email by sending the pertinent
info to . I am new to this service as well
and suggest to those who use it to ask for additioinal
information on how to best retrieve documents.
Here's a list of the current databases available for
searching:
1. ANSAXANSAX-L: Anglo-Saxon Listserv
2. BIBLIO *** MUN Library Catalogue ***
3. CANSIM Canadian Socio-Economic Time Series Database
4. CLASS Classification Literature Automated Search Servi
5. CNS ARCHIVESArchival records of the Centre for Nfld. Studies
6. CURRENT CONTENTS Index To 6,500 Journals
7. EXTENSIONDivision of Extension Resource Library
8. LABBIBCanadian Labour Bibliography
9. LINSICLabrador Institute of Northern Studies Info Cen.
10. MICROLOGCanadian Research and Report Literature
11. MUNFLAMUN Folklore and Language Archive
12. OEICOcean Engineering Information Centre
13. PABNewfoundland Periodical Article Bibliography
14. QUESTQueen's College Library Catalogue
15. RADICAL PAMPHLETS International Labour and Radical
History Pamphlets
16. RESERVESQueen Elizabeth II Library Reserve Collection
17. SLIDESGrenfell College Fine Arts Slides Database
18. AULS Atlantic Union List of Serials

NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
(mailing address)
Colonial Building, Military Road,
St. John's, Newfoundland
A1C 2C9
(709) 754-9525
(located at)
Room 421,
Canada Post Office Building,
354 Water Street, St. John's
President: Patrick Walsh - E-Mail:

This is an excellent society with a great quarterly
publication called the Ancestor. Annual membership fee is
$25.00 Can / year. Non Canadian orders remit $25.00 US.

NEWFOUNDLAND HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The Newfoundland Historical Society was formed in 1880 and
is a registered charitible organization. Membership fees
and donations are tax deductable. Research done for
inquiries is free of charge but donations and/or memberships
are greatly appreciated. The membership fee for 1993 was
$20.00 (Can) and includes a subscription to the Newfoundland
Quarterly, an excelent publication covering historical
events in the province, many of value to genealogists. To
become a member of the Newfoundland Historical Society,
write the following address:
The Newfoundland Quarterly
Room 15, Colonial Building
St. John's, Newfoundland
A1C 2C9
You can also subscribe to the Newfoundland Quarterly only
for $12.00 (Can) or $15.00 (Can) per year for non Canadian
subscribers). Mailing Address:
Newfoundland Quarterly
PO Box 13486, Station A
Knemount Road, St. John's, Newfoundland
A1B 4B8

Probate Gegistry, Courthouse Building, Water Street, St. John's
(wills post 1832)
Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador, Colonial
Building, Military Road, St. John's, A1C 2C9
Tel: (709) 729-3065
Fax: (729) 729-0578
The records held at 'PANL' are photocopies, transcripts, or
microfilm copies of parish records. The originals are still
in the posession of the of the individual churches
throughout the province. Most records are pre 1891 so if
you are looking for a later one, the contact is Vital
Statistics Division, Government of Newfoundland, address
enclosed. The PANL can conduct ONE record search per
inquiry. Ask for a specific record, that is, baptismal,
marriage, and so on. You must include a FULL NAME,
approximate DATE of the record being sought, place of
RESIDENCE, and RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION. Staff are willing to
search a ten year time time period. Actual records can not
be photocopied but a TRUE COPY of a baptism, marriage or
burial record may be obtained for a fee of $5.00
Apart from the church registers mentioned above, the holding
of the Archives include wills, newspapers, directories,
early court records, deeds of sale, registers of deeds,
early books and magazines; most of the records date back to
the early 1800's.

PROVINCIAL REFERENCE AND RESOURCE LIBRARY
Newfoundland Collection
Arts and Culture Centre
St. John's, Newfoundland
A1B 3A3
Tel: (709) 737-3954
Fax: (709) 737-3009
Although a visit to the library is desirable, it is not
required to access information for family history purposes.
David Leamon, Newfoundland Collection Technician, at the
Library, has developed a comprehensive list of reference
material he has available to do searches on. An
introductory letter / fax requesting information on best how
to utilize this valuable resource is recommended.

Roman Catholic Church of Canada,
PO Box 771, Grand Falls, Nfld, A2A 2M4
PO Box 545, Labrador City, Nfld., A2V 2K7
16 Hammond Drive, Corner Brook, Nfld, A2H 2W2
PO Box 37, St. John's, Nfld, A1C 5H5T

St. John's Archives
The Archives has a wide selection of information of interest
to those researching families from the St. John's area.
Questions regarding their holdings can be directed to the
following address.
City of St. John's Archives
City Hall, P.O. Box 908
St. John's, Newfoundland
A1C 5M2
Tel: (709) 576-8226
Those wishing to visit should call ahead to make
arrangements with the archivist.

Trinity Historical Society, Trinity, Nfld, A0C 2S0

Twillingate Museum Association, Twillingate, Nfld, A0G 4M0

United Church of Canada Archives, 320 Elizabeth Avenue, St.
John's, Nfld, A1E 1R1

-----------------------------------------------------------------
GENERAL INFO
------------

CIVIL REGISTRATION IN NEWFOUNDLAND

Started in 1891. Before this, the clergy of the various
denominations maintained records of birth or baptism, marriage
and death. The church registers containing this information are
in the Provincial Archives. The official records since civil
registration commenced are in the Vital Statistics Division of
the Dept. of Health. Although not open to public search,
information and certified copies are available for a fee. Always
request a full copy. The Provincial Archives have microfilmed
birth records from 1891-1923 and this material in open for public
search.

The oldest parish registers in existence are those of the Church
of England. These date from 1752. Catholic registers for St.
John's start in 1798; Methodist registers at Carbonear in 1794;
Presbyterian registers in 1842 in St. John's; and
Congregationalist registers in the 1780's.
-------------------------
CENSUS RETURNS

Census retyurns are maintained by the Dept. of Social Services at
the Confederation Building in St. John's. Census returns are
available up to 1945.
Early censuses include those for the Plaisance (Placentia) area
in 1671, 1673, 1706, and 1711. There were several other general
censuses in other parts of the colony in 1691, 1693, and 1704.
However, any returns before 1698 gave only the heads of the
household. All are on microfilm. Province wide censuses were
held in 1911, 1921, 1935, and 1945; and thereafter held in the
same years as the rest of Canada. Only fragments of the 1911
census survive.

The places covered by the censuses between 1921 and 1945 are
listed below and are in boty the National Archives and the
Provincial Archives in St. John's and may be borrowed through the
inter-library loan system.
Bay de Verde, 1935,1945 Humber, 1935, 1945
Bay de Verge, 1921 Labrador, 1935,1945
Bell Island, 1935, 1945 La Poile, 1921,1935,1945
Bonavista,1935 Mill Fortune, 1935
Bonavista North, 1945 Placentia, 1921,1935,1945
Bonavista South, 1945 Placentia West, 1945
Burgeo, 1921, 1935, 1945 Port au Port 1921
Burin, 1921, 1935, 1945 Port-de-Grave, 1921,1935,1945
Carbonear, 1921 St. Barbe, 1921, 1935, 1945
Carbouer, 1945 St. George, 1935
Ferryland, 1921, 1935 St. John's, 1945
Fogo, 1921,1935,1945 St. John's E, 1921,1935,1945
Fortune, 1935 St. John's W, 1921,1935, 1945
Fortune Hermitage, 1921,1945 St. Mary's, 1921,1935,1945
Grand Falls, 1945 St. Mary's W, 1935
Green Bay, 1945 Trinity, 1921, 1935, 1945
Hbr Grace, 1921,1935,1945 Trinity N, 1945
Harbour Main, 1921, 1945 Trinity S, 1945
White Bay, 1935,1945
-------------------------

WILLS

The probate records date back to the 1700's and are in three
locations. Those from 1832 on are in the Probate Registry,
Courthouse Bldg., Water St., St. John's. Earlier ones are in the
Provincial Archives and the Registry of Deeds, Confederation
Bldg.. Wills from the Burin area are all in the Provincial
Archives. There are plans to enter all wills and enter them into
their computer.
-------------------------

LAND RECORDS

A great deal of genealogical information can often be gained from
land records and conveyances of property. You may find
references to wills, and to other members of the particular
property-owner's family. The Registry of Deeds, in the
Confedretion Bldg. is the main source for more recent land
information. The earlier and original Crown Land Grants are in
the Crown Lands Office, Howley Building, St. John's.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Some Genealogical Information Sources :
---------------------------------------
1. Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, by E.R. Seary.
This book is an invaluable guide to researching Newfoundland
roots. Alphabetical listings of surnames include references
to early instances of the name, the communities involved,
many dates and present day occurances. It also points the
way for other references to the name. An invaluable
resource.
2. McAlpines Newfoundland Directory, 1894 - 1897
3. McAlpines Newfoundland Directory, 1898
4. McAlpines Newfoundland Directory, 1904
5. Lovell's Newfoundland Directory, 1871
6. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1825-1850, by Gertrude Crosbie
7. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1851-1859, by Gertrude Crosbie
8. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1860-1865, by Gertrude Crosbie
9. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1866-1870, by Gertrude Crosbie
10. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1871-1874, by Gertrude Crosbie
11. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1875-1877, by Gertrude Crosbie
12. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1878-1880, by Gertrude Crosbie
13. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1881-1882, by Gertrude Crosbie
14. Births, Marriages and Deaths in Newfoundland Newspapers,
1883-1884, by Gertrude Crosbie
15. Vital Statistics and Items from Newspapers of Newfoundland,
compiled by Mildred Howard
16. Directory for the Towns of St. John's, Harbour Grace, and
Carbonear, Newfoundland for 1885-1886. Compiled and arranged
by John Sharpe, 119 Water Street, St. John's, 1885
17. Might and Company Directory for St. John's, Harbour Grace and
Carbonear, Newfoundland, 1890
18. Newfoundland Directory for 1936 (Copyright 1936 by
Newfoundland Directories, Geo. H. Andrews, Proprietor)
19. List of Electors, 1948

-----------------------------------------------------------------
THE FOLLOWING RECORDS ARE LOCATED AT THE MARITIME HISTORY
ARCHIVE:
20. Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen, Agreements and
Account of Crew, 1863-1938: Agreements and account of crew
of British Empire vessels, containing the names of officers
and seamen; their date and place of birth; the date and
place and date joining the vessel; the previous vessel;
wages; rank and reason for leaving the vessel; ports of call
and description of the vessel.
21. Keith Mathews Name Files: Data on individuals, families and
businesses that were involved in the settlement, fisheries
and trade of Newfoundland from the earliest settlement to
1850. Complied from a variety of sources from Newfoundland
and the West of England, the files include data on 7,300
surnames.
22. Lloyd's Captains Registers, 1851-1948: Registers containing
an alphabetical list of certified masters, giving place and
date of birth, the port and date of examination, the names
of the ships in which he served, whether as master or mate,
subsequent to the examination.
23. Newfoundland Plantation Books, 1804-1810: Plantation book of
Bonavista 1805-6, and Conception Bay 1804-6; register of
fishing rooms at Twillingate and places adjacent 1806
onwards.
24. English Parish Records Collection, 1530-1830: Records of the
parishes of South West England, particularly the counties of
Devon, Dorset, Sommerset and Hamshire. The collection
focuses on those areas which supplied crews for the
Newfoundland fishery, the places of origin of Newfoundland
settlers. Devon parishes predominate.
25. Newfoundland Parish Records Collection, 1753-1966
Transcripts and photocopies of mostly 19th century parish
records of all denominations. The majority of the records
are for parishes in Conception Bay.
26. Census Records: Many of the collections held at the Maritime
History Archive contain data on returns of the population of
Newfoundland and Labrador. From the John Berry census of
1675, through to the first complete surviving nominal
census, 1921, the MHA has compiled a listing of all the
available information on population from 1650 onwards, from
various record series.
27. Mercantile Records: The business records of over 50
mercantile establishments from many areas of Newfoundland.
28. Index to Newfoundland Captains: This index was compiled from
data contained in the transcripts of the &quot;Certificates of
Vessel Registry for Newfoundland, 1820-1920&quot;. It is an
alphabetical listing of all the captains whose names were
entered on the certificates, with the name of the vessel
served on and the date of its registry.
29. Index of Newfoundland Shipowners: This is a computer
generated index from the transcripts of the Certificates of
vessel registry for Newfoundland, 1820-1920, and consists of
an alphabetical list of persons having shares in
Newfoundland vessels. Information includes the name of the
vessel, its official number, year and number of the
registry, tonnage, the residence and occupation of each
shipowner.
30. Irish Parish Records Collection, 1671-1900: Copies of the
original registers of Roman Catholic and Church of Ireland
parishes in the Irish counties of Cork, Clare, Derry, Kerry,
Kilkenny, Waterford and Wexford. The main concentration is
in from 1750-1880. The collection is indexed by parish.
31. Student Papers: Collections of over 2,000 research papers
completed by graduate and undergraduate students in the
course of their studies in Newfoundland history and
geography. The majority of the papers are on community and
family histories, other subjects include education, health,
law, merchants, politics, religion, fishery etc..
32. A collection of personal diaries and journals, narratives,
data on shipwrecks, directories, almanacs, ship registers,
newspapers etc. also can provide a wide scope of
information.
-----------
END
--
John Holwell
76 Tartan Drive,
Nepean, Ontario, Canada, K2J 3K3
(613) 825-9043 /
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 12:21:12 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: David Chapin &lt;&gt;
Subject: FAQ: Searching GATECH Archives (long)

Originally written by: Cliff Manis ()
date: 28 May 1994
Updated and tested by: David Chapin ()
date: 30 Dec 1994

This FAQ was originally designed for the ROOTS-L
archives. I have taken the basics and updated
them for the genealogy lists at Georgia Tech.
-D.C.

This file should help many of you learn to use the LISTSERV and
genealogy Database Search Commands.

ABOVE ALL, Remember this: Learning to use the LISTSERV JOBs
is worth your time and effort.

PLEASE: for your own knowledge, read the entire message before
using this information. . . .

Using the genealogy database search commands for your research effort
can be fun. (Save this message, and use it later as reference)

NOTE: All the JOB commands in the file have been tested as being VALID
by a disinterested party, and they work as they are typed in
this message. Many users have told me they do no work for them
but that has been because they changed something other than
the name they were searching, added a space, took out a space,
or in general did not read this message before trying to use
the JOB. Bottom line, says did you read all of this message !

HINT: Copy the message to a new file, edit the file, and
only change one thing at a time, and send the JOB.

If your JOB did not work, read the message again, try again.

In this file - I am showing a few examples.

Please limit your JOB searches to only 5 per day. The database will be
there tomorrow, so you don't have to find everything the first day.
This is a very powerful command, and takes extensive computer resources,
slowing the entire system.

I have added a new command to the JOB listed below. It also has the
words &quot;Prime=No&quot;. This will DELAY the search until after 5 PM local time
at gitvm1.gatech.edu. This is allow them to process the regular
needed JOBs during the day, and your 'genealogical search jobs&quot; will be
'run' and processed by the computer after 5PM.

Also some of the subscribers were having problems with the rules or Rules
lines in the jobs and the seem to work better if in uppercase. Please
use the upper and lowercase as seen below.

Please note: For all computer requests concerning the genealogy area we
only use two different types of email addresses:

LISTSERV address: is for requests from the
computer. =&gt;This means that all the JOBs for
searching the archives should be sent to this
address.&lt;= The listserv address is:
.

Group address: is for posting a message
which will be seen by everyone who is subscribed
to the genealogy mailing list, and the message will
also be cross-posted to the USENET soc.genealogy.*
newsgroup. =&gt;Your JOBs SHOULD NEVER be sent to
these addresses.&lt;=

examples:
== s.g.jewish
== s.g.surnames
== s.g.misc
== s.g.french
== s.g.computing
== s.g.methods

Every message sent through the genealogy groups since December 1994 has been
archived and the data may be searched. In some cases, archives
are available for earlier dates (e.g. since Dec. 1993 for JEWGEN)

These commands are available to all, and we need to use them with care.
This message is an attempt to make a search easy to use, easy to
understand and produce the desired output.

You may request detailed information about the DATABASE by sending the
following line to the LISTSERV address:

INFO DATABASE

CAUTION::::: The info database file is about 95k in length.

The use the LISTSERV database in the genealogy area, just send the
following examples to the LISTSERV address:

DO NOT send your request messages to the JEWGEN address.
DO NOT send your request messages to the GENNAM-L address.
DO NOT send your request messages to the GENMSC-L address.
DO NOT send your request messages to the GEN-FR-L address.
DO NOT send your request messages to the GENCMP-L address.
DO NOT send your request messages to the GENMTD-L address.

==&gt; Send them ONLY to the address: &lt;==

For your convenience, these jobs have been formatted to help you request
messages from the list. The job control messages you need to have in your
email request are included as examples.

To make your request, include the message you are reading in email which you
will send to: (or if you read this
in Bitnet). You may be able to use the forward command of your mail program
to do that. DO NOT send your request to any mailing list. We keep repeating
this because we know that some people will ignore this advice anyway. If you
don't want the wrath of hundreds of readers, please head our advice. JOBs
which are sent to the wrong place waste bandwidth and alot of people's time.

Edit the forwarded message you are sending as follows:

1: Delete everything above the // JOB line
2: Remove the &quot;&gt; &quot; or other characters inserted by your mailer at the
beginning of each line and any signature lines which were added to
the end of the message.
3: Mail it in to .

=========================================================

1. EXAMPLE ONE This example will find the message numbers of
=========== of all the GENNAM-L messages posted since Dec 1994
which have the word smith in them.

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
search smith in GENNAM-L since 94/12/29
INDEX
------- end cut here --------------------------

The output of this job looks like this:

&gt;&gt; search smith in GENNAM-L since 94/12/29
&gt;--&gt; Database GENNAM-L, 6 hits.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; INDEX
&gt;Item # Date Time Recs Subject
&gt;------ ---- ---- ---- -------
&gt;001352 94/12/29 09:25 33 VERCHERE Albert Marc; CHE&gt;ENG&gt;USA? 1832-1878
&gt;001400 94/12/29 10:24 21 SMITH; Brompton QC,CAN 1836-1905
&gt;001429 94/12/29 11:07 20 ARRINGTON; Cherokee Co,AL,USA -1835
&gt;001436 94/12/29 12:02 34 DUKES John; IRL &gt;NC,USA &gt;GA,USA 1770-1820
&gt;001468 94/12/29 12:43 33 GATES Isaac; NY,USA 1740 - 1800
&gt;001506 94/12/30 00:47 63 HARGITT George F.; SCT&gt;CAN&gt;USA 1837-1927

2. EXAMPLE TWO This example will find all the message numbers
=========== with the words (reunion and windows) in the same
message or if the message contains the word
mac you will also get a hit. The LISTSERV
is searching for these words in all messages
posted since Dec 25, 1994, and all this
in a messages not sent by Chapin.

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
search (reunion and windows) or (mac) in GENCMP-L -
where sender does not contain chapin since 94/12/25
INDEX
------- end cut here --------------------------

The output of this JOB looks like this:

&gt;&gt; search (reunion and windows) or (mac) in GENCMP-L -
&gt;&gt; where sender does not contain chapin since 94/12/25
&gt;--&gt; Database GENCMP-L, 8 hits.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; INDEX
&gt;Item # Date Time Recs Subject
&gt;------ ---- ---- ---- -------
&gt;000240 94/12/25 03:27 20 Re: Family Tree Maker for Windows
&gt;000248 94/12/25 15:34 44 Re: ? - programs not DOS based
&gt;000250 94/12/26 03:49 95 Re: ? - programs not DOS based
&gt;000259 94/12/26 20:00 190 Weekly Posting: Index of Roots-L FAQ files
&gt;000260 94/12/26 21:31 33 Re: REUNION:Pedigree Charts?
&gt;000261 94/12/26 23:04 19 MAC gene prog. needed
&gt;000269 94/12/27 23:26 11 Re: MAC gene prog. needed
&gt;000277 94/12/29 02:55 37 Re: Calendar Program: Julian vs. Gregorian

3. EXAMPLE THREE This example will select the INDEX numbers found
============= in a previous search and retrieve the actual
messages. [Note: If you subscribe to a mailing list
in INDEX mode, you will retrieve actual messages
in this same manner.]

On the line beginning with &quot;Print&quot;, replace the string of &quot;nnnn&quot;s with
the numbers of the messages you want to have emailed to you. Separate
the numbers with spaces and don't exceed 80 characters per line. If you
need more space, add additional lines beginning with &quot;Print&quot; followed by
message numbers. You may indicate a range of messages by using a hyphen
(ie 6721-6728).

GENERIC VERSION:
------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database search DD=Orders
//Orders DD *
Select * in LISTNAME.(a range of numbers will be here)
Print nnnn nnnn nnnn
------- end cut here --------------------------

WORKING EXAMPLE:
------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database search DD=Orders
//Orders DD *
Select * in GENCMP-L.(240-277)
Print 240 260 277
------- end cut here --------------------------

The output of this JOB will be three actual
postings concatenated together.

4. EXAMPLE FOUR
============

Q. When asked for output on the name DAY I got back several hundred
file numbers ... none of which contained the surname DAY but
all of which contained the word 'day' in some form or other, e.g.
holiday, Sunday, etc. Is there a more sophisticated way I can
search this surname and get only surnames?

A. Yes, there is a way. Note the quotes and the spaces:

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
search &quot; DAY &quot; or &quot; Day &quot; in JEWGEN since 94/01/01
INDEX
------- end cut here --------------------------

5. EXAMPLE FIVE This example will search for a particular person
============ who was the originator of a message(s).
Please note: it may produce a LARGE size file,
especially if you put a big range of DATES in the
request.

Here is the JOB that works as is:

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database Search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
search * in GEN-FR-L since 94/11/01 -
where sender contains beauregard
list #.6R &quot;Item #&quot; -
Subject(1,40).40L &quot; Subject of Message&quot; -
Sender(1,25).25L &quot; From&quot;
------- end cut here --------------------------

The &quot;-&quot; at end of line is for continuation of that line.

Here is the JOB answer that I received.

&gt;&gt; search * in GEN-FR-L since 94/11/01 -
&gt;&gt; where sender contains beauregard
&gt;--&gt; Database GEN-FR-L, 1 hit.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; list #.6R &quot;Item #&quot; -
&gt;&gt; Subject(1,40).40L &quot; Subject of Message&quot; -
&gt;&gt; Sender(1,25).25L &quot; From&quot;
&gt;Item # Subject of Message From
&gt;------ ------------------- -----
&gt; 116 etrange... Denis.Beauregard%161-705@

6. EXAMPLE SIX This example shows two different jobs that
=========== produce the same results. JOB1 is simpler syntax
to understand because of the use of continuation
and spaces. This is the same search as in EXAMPLE 5.

The LIST command is separate (INDEX is just a default LIST format).
The Date goes with the Search command.
&quot;contains&quot; is the opposite of &quot;does not contain&quot;.

JOB1:

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database Search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
search * in GEN-FR-L -
where sender contains beauregard -
since 94/11/01
list #.6R &quot;Item #&quot; -
Subject(1,25).25L &quot;Subject&quot; -
Sender(1,50).50L &quot;From&quot;
------- end cut here --------------------------

JOB2:

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database Search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
search * in GEN-FR-L where sender contains beauregard since 94/11/01
list #.6R &quot;Item #&quot; Subject(1,25).25L &quot;Subject&quot; Sender(1,50).50L &quot;From&quot;
------- end cut here --------------------------

7. EXAMPLE SEVEN This example shows a powerful capability of the
============= search software. It will enable you to do searches
based on the way the name sounds rather than
how it's spelled. I'm not sure the way this operates,
users will have to experiment. Also note that it
only works on the SUBJECT lines, not on the message
bodies. This facility is quite powerful for GENNAM-L
where there are standard subject lines with names
included. It is also powerful in JEWGEN where similar
sounding names can be spelled very differently.
Because of the structure of the older (pre-GATECH)
JEWGEN archives, it will not find anything in these.

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
Select * in JEWGEN where SUBJECT sounds like CONE
INDEX
------- end cut here --------------------------

The output looks like this:

&gt;&gt; Select * in JEWGEN where SUBJECT sounds like CONE
&gt;--&gt; Database JEWGEN, 8 hits.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; INDEX
&gt;Item # Date Time Recs Subject
&gt;------ ---- ---- ---- -------
&gt;000212 94/12/14 20:34 15 The Unbroken Chain
&gt;000324 94/12/14 08:22 11 Re my use of the Unbroken Chain
&gt;000422 94/12/20 04:08 9 Can you tell me?
&gt;000637 94/12/19 10:32 31 Re my use of the Unbroken Chain
&gt;000754 94/12/25 14:38 20 COHEN- Priest
&gt;000769 94/12/25 23:03 39 Re: COHEN- Priest
&gt;000770 94/12/26 00:36 29 Re: COHEN- Priest
&gt;000801 94/12/27 04:04 23 Re: COHEN- Priest

Notice that it correctly matches COHEN, but incorrectly
matches Chain and Can.

8. EXAMPLE EIGHT
=============

Readers....................Here is the last example:

...but, be warned ! !

...but, be warned that you need to use the 'from DATE to DATE'
with extreme caution, because you to be asking the computer
to create a VERY - VERY large file before you know it ! ! !

------- begin cut here ------------------------
// JOB Echo=No,Reply-To=None,Prime=No
Database Search DD=Ruless
//Rules DD *
search * in GENMTD-L from 94/12/26 to 94/12/28
list #.6R &quot;Item #&quot; Date(1,8).9 &quot;Date &quot; Time(1,5).5 &quot;Time&quot; -
Sender(1,50).50L &quot;From&quot;
------- end cut here --------------------------

Please note the the JOB above was only for a 2 day period, and it
produced an output of 20 hits. (as seen below)

Please note in the &quot;Date &quot; line above that it will produce a
separation line of 8 dashes as seen below in the output:

&gt;&gt; search * in GENMTD-L from 94/12/26 to 94/12/28
&gt;--&gt; Database GENMTD-L, 20 hits.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; list #.6R &quot;Item #&quot; Date(1,8).9 &quot;Date &quot; Time(1,5).5 &quot;Time&quot; -
&gt;&gt; Sender(1,50).50L &quot;From&quot;
&gt;Item # Date Time From
&gt;------ -------- ---- ----
&gt; 295 94/12/26 22:42
&gt; 296 94/12/26 22:47
&gt; 297 94/12/26 23:09
&gt; 298 94/12/26 23:12
&gt; 299 94/12/26 23:16
&gt; 300 94/12/26 23:19
&gt; 301 94/12/27 08:19
&gt; 302 94/12/27 18:02
&gt; 303 94/12/27 18:06
&gt; 304 94/12/27 18:12
&gt; 305 94/12/27 18:16
&gt; 306 94/12/27 18:22
&gt; 307 94/12/27 18:27
&gt; 308 94/12/27 18:32
&gt; 309 94/12/27 18:36
&gt; 310 94/12/27 18:39
&gt; 311 94/12/28 23:14
&gt; 312 94/12/28 23:53
&gt; 313 94/12/28 23:56
&gt; 314 94/12/28 23:59

=========================================================

**** CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ******

Since you are reading this file through a Newsgroup/Mailing List, you are
probably interested in learning more about your family history.

This JOB information is important. ...and you should read it all...

Let me say you all may request your own file from the LISTSERV
which tells all about how the JOBs work.

You can request a file from the LISTSERV which tells all about how
to use a JOB on the LISTSERV by simply sending the following one-line
as the only text in the body of a message to:

INFO JOB

Then you may also learn it all on your own.

Searching, finding information, and the utilization of tools/utilities
available is what GENEALOGY is all about. The best way to learn about
the JOBs is to do it yourself, and I have. I need to learn how to best
utilize it for myself while doing some research, and it's also a good
time to teach others who have an interest.

The search utility is available so learn to use it. We are no longer
in the Ice-age.

GOOD LUCK!!

*** David Chapin | ***
*** Plano, Texas | ***
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 12:23:41 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Denis Beauregard &lt;&gt;
Organization: Institut de recherche d'Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Canada
Subject: Quebec original records

This article is the translation of section 1 of an article in French
(it can be retrieved from GEN-FR-L archives or read from s.g.french).
The original also includes a section about records out of Quebec
available in Montreal and census. Original title is:

Pour verifier des actes (au Quebec)

This article is a compendum of _original_ records
of Quebec vital records.

beginning to 1876, church copy of catholic records: microfilms
by LDS church, available from LDS and in some libraries (in
Montreal, see ANQ and BNQ; in Quebec, see ANQ)

beginning to 1899/1900, court house copy of non-catholic records
and 1876-1899/1900 of catholic records: microfilms by ANQ,
available near ANQ and from 1996 in Salle Gagnon (Montreal).
Can be purchased from Federation des familles souches du Quebec
C.P. 6700, Sillery, (Quebec) G1T 2W2

beginning to about 1960, some parishes only: some libraries have
their own microfilms of original church records and some
records can then be verified.
SGCF: Vercheres, some places in Lac St-Jean, some others
Soc. historique du comte de Shefford (Granby): Granby area catholics

from 1900 to today: the only original source is one of the copies
at church presbytery or in the regional center of vital records
(Montreal and Quebec). In the first case, you write to the priest,
visit him or call him to know what he allows or how much he charges
(some dioceses forbid consultation). Don't forget many persons
are not able to speak English in Quebec (where official language
is French), or will understand if you speak s-l-o-w-l-y, or if you
write them. In the second case, for now, you will have to pay
for an official copy around $10 and for search). province-wide
index starts in 1926 and is not complete.

from 1926 to 1989, there is a province-wide consolidated index
for marriages and deaths (births are not available) at Pavillon
Lafontaine and in ANQ-Mtl. In Pavillon Lafontaire, you will
also find more years and marriage forms (filled for statistics
and not the official record). 1926-1945 are copies. 1974 to
now include names of parents. All forms include date and place
of marriage and names of parties.

from 1900 to 1935, Institut Drouin (a private company) has a
copy of many records (church copy). Those records were used for
their dictionaries. No idea about fees for search or check,
but there is no place to receive external searchers.

Notary records of over 100 years (and this usually means the last
year the notary was on duty or living), are available at ANQ.

--
Ce message represente uniquement l'opinion de son auteur et
n'engage en aucune facon son employeur.
Denis Beauregard Internet:
Programmez avec de la classe: essayez le C++
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 12:26:02 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: John Sankey &lt;&gt;
Organization: The National Capital FreeNet, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Subject: Re: Really, Really FRUSTRATING!

Unbalanced as it may seem to us, there really are a lot of
people out there who couldn't care less who their relatives
and ancestors are. My grandfather used to call everyone in his
neighbourhood a &quot;cousin&quot; because he was sure he was right!
(Based on my research, he was in fact very close to it, as a
fifth-generation descendant of the first English-speaking
arrival.) ALL the details of that branch of my family came
from my grandmother.
If they aren't interested, don't get frustrated, just forget
about them. There are lots more interesting people out there.
Like us!
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 17:42:33 PST
Reply-To: Gkrell &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Gkrell &lt;&gt;
Organization: America Online, Inc. (1-800-827-6364)
Subject: AR Marriage Records-Statewide Index?

I am looking for a marriage record in Arkansas as follows:

Mary Josephine ENLOE, b. 28 Sep 1865, Savannah, Hardin Co. TN, married
Francis Hickman BOWEN, abt 1880, probably somewhere in AR...

I have contacted the two most likely counties where this marrage
occurred, with no luck. The statewide registration of marriages does
not go back this far. No one I've talked to in AR knows of a
statewide marraige index. Can anyone offer some ideas on my problem?

Thanks. Gary Krell, Longview, TX
X-Message:
Date: Sat, 31 Dec 1994 19:40:20 PST
Reply-To: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Sender: Genealogical methods and resources &lt;&gt;
Comments: Warning -- original Sender: tag was
From: Paul Goettlich &lt;&gt;
Organization: Delphi ( email, 800-695-4005 voice)
Subject: Re: Death Records in CT

Diana H. Bailey &lt;&gt; writes:

&gt;Does anyone know the easiest way to find a death record in CT?

IN%&quot;&quot;

Paul Petersen
BNS News Service
35 Birch Street
Manchester, CT 06040

Genealogical service
looks up obits at state CT libaray

X-Message:
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