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Archiver > GATHOMAS > 2007-06 > 1182198492


From: "Carole Drexel" <>
Subject: [GATHOMAS] Thomas Mills family
Date: Mon, 18 Jun 2007 15:28:12 -0500
References: <mailman.535.1182065245.30146.gathomas@rootsweb.com>
In-Reply-To: <mailman.535.1182065245.30146.gathomas@rootsweb.com>


I'm a descendant of the Thomas Mills family from Screven and I loved this
post! These are large families, and it always helps to add another puzzle
piece. Thomas Mills daughter, Elizabeth "Betsy" Mills, married James Jones
of Bulloch County, GA, son of Francis Jones of Burke County, GA and of
Wales. Elizabeth was born 26 April 1774. I don't have a death date. James
Jones died in 1824 and is buried in the Jones-Young cemetery in Bulloch
County, GA. I presume that Betsy outlived him as there is no grave or
tombstone for her in Bulloch County.

Most of the pioneering families to early Thomas/Brooks Counties did come
from or through Scriven (now Screven) County and Bulloch which was cut from
part of Scriven. Thomas Jones who married Lavenia Young and later built
Greenwood was a son of James Jones and his wife Elizabeth "Betsy" Mills.

Betsy was sister to Stephen Mills.



Today's Topics:

1. Re: HADLEY, PONDER, GRAHAM ()
2. Re: HADLEY, PONDER, GRAHAM ()
3. Re: Hadley Plantation ()
4. Re: Slaves-Hopkins-Thomas County,GA ()
5. The Hopkins Collection ()
6. Re: HADLEY, PONDER, GRAHAM ()


----------------------------------------------------------------------



Hezekiah Ponder married Nancy Ann Graham in 1801. My ancestor Wesley Forbes
married his second wife, Elizabeth Ponder Brown, but I don't have any of the
Ponder descendants listed on my rootsweb site. Others do, however.



Surnames: Ponder, Forbes, Mills, Burney, Bonnell, Bryan, Perryman,
Parramore, Wolf, Lanier, Phillips
Classification: queries


I am nearly finished reading William Warren Rogers' Antebellum Thomas County
1825-1861 published by The Florida State University press in Tallahassee in
1963, and it cites heavily from the Hopkins' Collection. I am going to
Thomasville again this summer to do research. I will made a stop at the
Georgia Archives to see the collection, for it evidently has great detail:
it lists, for example, names of children who were in school at Fletcher
Institute in 1854.

My great grandmother's brother and sister Wesley Berryan Mills and Lucy
Forbes Mills were at Fletcher Institute in the home of the Methodist
Episcopal Minister Peyton P. Smith on the 1850 Thomas Census. I would like
to see what year they last attended school there. Their mother Eliza Jane
Forbes Mills Jerkins died in early 1855 in Tallahassee. Their grandfather
Wesley Forbes was William G. Ponder's brother-in-law. William G. Ponder
was on the board of Fletcher Institute, which was a Florida ME
Conference-sponsored school. Ten of its students in 1850 were from Florida,
my great uncle and aunt among them.

Thomas Jones of Greenwood Plantation was also the nephew of their father
Thomas Mills (b. 1800-1810 in Screven Co, GA). I have only this week--after
three years of research and looking--connected my Thomas, Archibald,
Stephen, and Catherine Ann Mills of Leon, FL, and Early Co, GA, to the
Thomas Mills b. 1740 of Screven Co. The later Thomas was the father of
Betsy Mills, Thomas Jones' mother.

I have long thought that Thomas County was significant in my search; now I
know just how important. My great grandmother, daughter of Thomas and Eliza
Jane Forbes Mills was born in Thomasville in April of 1845 after her
father's death in Early County. I believe that Eliza Jane Forbes Mills went
there to be with relatives, perhaps her brother or cousin Wesley Forbes, who
married Ann H Everrit there in 1852.

According to the book The Burneys of North Carolina, Eliza Jane Forbes'
mother was Lucy Burney, daughter of Richard. According to this book, Eliza
Jane's husband Thomas Mills' mother was also one of Richard's daughters: she
was Jane Burney Gordon who married Stephen Mills of Screven County, GA. She
then Arthur Burney of Leon Co, FL, and died there in 1840. Jane Burney
Mills is buried at Indian Springs Church in Miccosukee on land that borders
the original land of Thomas Mills and Wesley Forbes.

I've always known that the Tallahassee people moved back and forth between
Thomasville and Tallahassee with the weather, the epidemics, and the Indian
uprisings. I believe that the Hopkins' Collection will be invaluable to
anyone who had ancestors in South Georgia and Northern Florida during
antebellum times.

Author: sdlee13
Surnames: Ponder, Forbes, Mills, Burney, Bonnell, Bryan, Perryman,
Parramore, Wolf, Lanier, Phillips
Classification: queries

In addition to the reply to a post of another subject with information about
the Hopkins Collection imbeded, I am begining a new thread because of the
significance of this collection:

I am nearly finished reading William Warren Rogers' Antebellum Thomas County
1825-1861 published by The Florida State University press in Tallahassee in
1963, and it cites heavily from the Hopkins' Collection. I am going to
Thomasville again this summer to do research. I will made a stop at the
Georgia Archives to see the collection, for it evidently has great detail.

It lists, for example, names of children who were in school at Fletcher
Institute in 1854. My great grandmother's brother and sister Wesley Berryan
Mills and Lucy Forbes Mills were at Fletcher Institute in the home of the
Methodist Episcopal Minister Peyton P. Smith on the 1850 Thomas Census. I
would like to see what year they last attended school there. Their mother
Eliza Jane Forbes Mills Jerkins died in early 1855 in Tallahassee. Their
grandfather Wesley Forbes was William G. Ponder's brother-in-law. William G.
Ponder was on the board of Fletcher Institute, which was a Florida ME
Conference-sponsored school. Ten of its students in 1850 were from Florida,
my great uncle and aunt among them.

Thomas Jones of Greenwood Plantation was also the nephew of their father
Thomas Mills (b. 1800-1810 in Screven Co, GA). I have only this week--after
three years of research and looking--connected my Thomas, Archibald,
Stephen, and Catherine Ann Mills of Leon, FL, and Early Co, GA, to the
Thomas Mills b. 1740 of Screven Co. The later Thomas was the father of Betsy
Mills, Thomas Jones' mother.

I have long thought that Thomas County was significant in my search; now I
know just how important. My great grandmother, daughter of Thomas and Eliza
Jane Forbes Mills was born in Thomasville in April of 1845 after her
father's death in Early County. I believe that Eliza Jane Forbes Mills went
there to be with relatives, perhaps her brother or cousin Wesley Forbes, who
married Ann H Everrit there in 1852.

According to the book The Burneys of North Carolina, Eliza Jane Forbes'
mother was Lucy Burney, daughter of Richard. According to this book, Eliza
Jane's husband Thomas Mills' mother was also one of Richard's daughters: she
was Jane Burney Gordon who married Stephen Mills of Screven County, GA. She
then Arthur Burney of Leon Co, FL, and died there in 1840. Jane Burney Mills
is buried at Indian Springs Church in Miccosukee on land that borders the
original land of Thomas Mills and Wesley Forbes.

I've always known that the Tallahassee people moved back and forth between
Thomasville and Tallahassee with the weather, the epidemics, and the Indian
uprisings. I believe that the Hopkins' Collection will be invaluable to
anyone who had ancestors in South Georgia and Northern Florida during
antebellum times.
For good reading background

on Tallahassee:

Creating an Old South: Middle Florida's Frontier before the Civil War by
Edward E. Baptist, Univ of NC Press,2002 (about the power structure of the
old Southern frontier as it played out in Tallahassee, the duels--which
Rogers says carried over into early Thomas County--the crooked politics, the
fermenting nature of its social structures, the insatiable need for slaves
that brought the ills of forced migration)

The Red Hills of Florida, 1528-1865 by Clifton Paisley, Univ of AL Press,
1989 (also has info on the Ponders)

on Thomasville:

Antebellum Thomas County 1825-1861 by Willaim Warren Rogers, FL State Univ
Press, 1963

On life in the old South:
Introduction to Sacred Groves and Ravished Gardens: The Fiction of Eudora
Welty, Carson McCullers, and Flannery O'Conner by Louise Westley, Univ of GA
Press, 1985 (pp 22-34 devoted to a discussion of the rampant miscegenation
in the Old South)

The Mind of the South by W. J. Cash, published by Alfred A. Knopf, 1941
(published long ago, but an undeniable telescope into the workings of the
Old South)


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