ESSEX-UK-L Archives

Archiver > ESSEX-UK > 2004-09 > 1096438225


From: "Diane Sowden" <>
Subject: Re: This forename of NANNY
Date: Wed, 29 Sep 2004 07:10:25 +0100
References: <0I4R00L6DOF3NY@l-daemon>


That is very interesting, some of my rellies couldn't spell. I think that
this is why most of our rellies DID speak instead of writing things down.
Because they couldn't.

Diane
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Polson" <>
To: <>
Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2004 8:50 PM
Subject: Re: This forename of NANNY


> The pet name for any proper name beginning with a vowel often
> adds "N" at the beginning--thus, Ned, Nan, Nell, Noll, for Edward,
> Ann, Ellen (or Helen), Oliver. And no, Nick is not short for Ickolas.
>
> Incidentally, "nickname" comes from "eke" name, "eke" being the
> Old English word for "also". An eke name becomes a nickname,
> just as a nadder becomes an adder and an ewte becomes a newt.
> You can tell that our ancestors spent most of their time speaking,
> not spelling.
>
> Jim Polson
> Vancouver
> >
> > In a message dated 28/09/2004 19:13:56 GMT Daylight Time,
> > writes:
> >
> > If anyone has access to a Chambers Dictionary a lot of first names and
their
> >
> > diminutives are listed in the back.
> >
> > Ann, Anne, Anna and Hannah are variants of this name with the
diminutives
> > given as Anita, Anneka, Annika, Annette, Annie, Nan, Nana, Nance,
Nancy,
> > Nanna, Nannie, Nanny, Nina, Ninette, Ninon. To confuse things even
more,
> > Nance and Nancy are also diminutives of Agnes
> >
> >
> > According to the Oxford Names Companion, under the Index of first names
> > there are these:
> >
> > 1) Nan (f) English: originally a pet form of ANN (for the initial N-,
cf.
> > NED). It is generally now used as a short form of NANCY.
> > Pet forms: Scottish: Nanny (Gaelic Nandag).
> >
> > 2) Nanna (f) Scandinavian: from the old Norse mythological woman's name
> > Nanna, a derivative of the elemement namp daring.
> >
> > 3) Nanne (m) Swedish: originally a short form of the the Old Norse
personal
> > name Nannulf, composed of the elements namp daring + ulfr wolf. Nowadays
it is
> > used a a pet form of Anders.
> >
> > Hope this helps
> >
> > Robin
> >
>
>
>



This thread: