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Archiver > ESSEX-UK > 2004-08 > 1092731090


From: "patricia salter" <>
Subject: Re: Bunting
Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 09:24:50 +0100
References: <1268E6E3.269C1DC8.006A19F4@aol.com> <017a01c483be$415aa160$a8790650@packard>


Hi Colleen
Yes I reckon that's what it was used for, but one anomaly here - I didnt
find any mention of bunting cloths in the inventory!
Patti



----- Original Message -----
From: "colleen morrison" <>
To: <>
Sent: Monday, August 16, 2004 7:24 PM
Subject: Re: Bunting


> So perhaps the closely woven bunting cloth was used to sieve the unwanted
> residues or whatever out of the plonk - or even to skim the 'sludge' off
the
> top?
>
> My grandmother used to make ginger beer from the root of the ginger plant,
> different thing, I know, but that had to be sieved when it had been brewed
> to take out all of the bits of root and, I think, to skim the sludge.
>
> Colleen
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <>
>
> > Just to throw another stone in the pond to see how far the ripples
> spread:
> >
> > I did a search for 'Bunting' on www.Dictionary.com. One of the hits
> suggested an alternative form of the word in 'Buntine'. Bunting/buntine
> was/is a name for finely sifted flour. It speculates the sieving was done
> using a woollen cloth which today is used mainly for making flags. <I
> paraphrase>.
>
>
>



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