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Archiver > ESSEX-UK > 2004-07 > 1090683516


From: "Pamela" <>
Subject: Re: maypole dancing
Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2004 16:39:58 +0100
References: <002e01c4716c$b4c23690$205030d5@windhorn> <00bc01c47188$3e040bc0$4d6e4e51@richardnj90qxg>


On the same line, we have May Pole dancing usually only now in the infants
schools but we also have Well Dressings where the water coming out of the
nature sources is blessed.

Pam
Staffordshire
----- Original Message -----
From: "Susan Hembury Kellow" <>
To: <>
Sent: Saturday, July 24, 2004 3:12 PM
Subject: Re: maypole dancing


> Good grief! Is that what they used to make us dance round at school? Me
> mum'd 'ave a blue fit! ;-)
>
> Actually, most of us learnt about the origins of Maypole Dancing when we
> were about 13; this led to the variety of dance called
> Maypole-Dancing-With-Extra-Sniggering, especially when we had to dance to
> that perennial song, "Come lasses and lads...". ;-) Teenagers are (and
have
> always been) pretty unsophisticated when it comes to humour.
>
> On a serious note, in Oxfordshire, where I lived as a child, they also had
> May Queens and garlands, etc. Does any lister know if Essex had similar
> spring customs?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Sue
>
> <snip>
> ----- Original Message -----
> > OK I'll risk being a bit of a Boring Old ! Maypole dancing - ribbons,
> > spider's web, all in a heap etc. - is in fact a revival, though great
> > fun
> > nonetheless! The original maypoles (i.e. pre Cromwell and presumably
> > when
> > restored after) were immensely tall. 70 foot was not unknown, and
> > ribbon
> > dancing was out of the question. Dance theuy did for sure, but not with
> > ribbons. It was far too phallic and fertile anyway to let
> > schoolchildren
> > loose on! The ribbons version wqith the small pole was part of the late
> > 19th century folk revival. Woops! End of sermon!
> > Anthony
> <snip>
>
>


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