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Archiver > ESSEX-UK > 2000-08 > 0967682256


From: "Harold C. Greenwood" <>
Subject: Re: Where is Friends?
Date: Thu, 31 Aug 2000 01:37:36 +0100
References: <014c01c01111$711cc140$238d01d4@dlamb> <00b901c01173$c700bf00$7f44fea9@ark.com> <009901c012a3$42b807e0$7f44fea9@ark.com> <39AD46AC.16CC@cwcom.net> <39AD7050.92D91D1E@xtra.co.nz>


Clyde,

So far as my understanding goes, the Quaker movement began in the late
1640s to 1650s. There is an excellent booklet "My Ancestors were
Quakers" published by the Society of Genealogists or you may wish to
consult the web-site "Quakers in Britain - The Religious Society of
Friends - Britain Yearly Meeting" http://www.quaker.org.uk/
which may perhaps help with other of your questions. Selecting "Quaker
Genealogy" on their main page, I found the following explanation of the
Quaker Digest:
QUOTE
"DIGEST REGISTERS

>From the mid-17th century, monthly meetings, some particular meetings
and some quarterly meetings kept register books of births, marriages and
burials. Between 1840 and 1842 under the Non-parochial Registers Act,
the Society surrendered 1445 original registers for the period up to
1837 to the Registrar-General; a further 121 were surrendered in 1857.
These are all now kept at the Public Record Office, as part of class
RG6. Friends, like Anglican incumbents, sometimes failed to make entries
in original registers; and some 17th and 18th century registers had
already been lost before the surrender of 1840. Completeness of
registration varies considerably between, say, London & Middlesex
Quarterly Meeting (very good) and Devon Quarterly Meeting, where there
are numerous gaps in the record.

Before surrender of these registers, the Society of Friends compiled
digests from them. Friends then began a new sequence of digest registers
which cover the period from 1837 to the mid-20th century. Microfilms of
both sequences may be consulted when the Library is open to readers.
(The sequence to 1837 is published by World Microfilms Publications,
London). ....

The Society of Genealogists has also acquired a set of the digest
registers on microfilm. ...."
UNQUOTE
I know from researching my Essex Quaker ancestors that some of the old
registers were lost or had disintegrated before the Digests were
prepared and there are disappointing gaps in what has survived. For
example, I have contemporary evidence of the marriage of my 5 x
great-grandparents in 1729/30 but can find no record of that event in
the surviving registers and consequently no mention in the Digest.

Harold
_________________________________________________________
On Thu, 31 Aug 2000 at 08:36:32 +1200, C.O.Hurrell wrote:
>
> It is fortuitous that this subject has cropped up as I am in the process
> of ploughing thru the Parish Registers of Felsted on microfilm ( the
> narrow one) at the local LDS FHL in PN,NZ. A real exercise in
> interpretation. Odd HURRELLs have cropped up down thru time but there
> does not seem to be any continuity. When did the Quaker movement evolve?
> Most interesting was the mention of affidavits or people that were
> buried in woollens and Then "buried with the Quakers"
> My main concern is trying to trace an Andrew HURRELL born ca
> 1741(rough)but no record. There is a marriage of a Thomas HURREL and
> Mary ABrAHAM married on aaaaaaapr 10 1721. But in the back of one
> register there is mention of 2 Quaker children being baptised in 1715
> and 1716, both HURRELLs. Cannot locate my record as this was in 1997 at
> ERO.
> In 1736 Marriage of John HURRELL of Writtle and Ann BENTALL of
> Halstead in the Felsted Register, ??Andrew HURRELL's Parents?
> My main query is were theses people drifting in and out of Quakerism to
> suit or by the law current at that time.
> This is the 1st time i have ever heard of a Quaker digest.
> Comments appreciated.
> Clydeh
> The Grounded
> Kiwi
>
>
>



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