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Archiver > DNA-R1B1C7 > 2011-07 > 1311956131


From: Bob Quinn <>
Subject: Re: [R-M222] Keilty surname research
Date: Fri, 29 Jul 2011 12:15:31 -0400
References: <21d94.5b3a8712.3b636892@aol.com>
In-Reply-To: <21d94.5b3a8712.3b636892@aol.com>


What can I learn from the FTDNA Haplotree page My Matches, John? I have "exact" matches with 10 "people", 6 from Ireland, from R1b1a2a1a1b4b. I am said to be R1b1a2.I have a bunch more with 1-step mutations, with the same, R1b1a2a1a1b4b Haplogroup, most of them from Ireland, 136 out of less than 200 "matches .What can I draw from that other than that I appear to be Irish and in the Ribia2 area? Does it indicate my ancestors pretty far back were from Orkney or Scandinavia or anything specific? Regards, Bob

Bob Quinn
President&CEO
Quinn Specialty Chemical Consultants

Partner at Bay Street Investors/Bay Street Partners
Co-Chair ACS GCI Manufacturer's Roundtable
27 Langton Lane
Newtown Square, Pa, 19073
T:610-331-4920
e-mail:
Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/bobquinnspecialtychemicals










> From:
> Date: Thu, 28 Jul 2011 21:36:18 -0400
> To: ;
> Subject: Re: [R-M222] Keilty surname research
>
>
>
> In a message dated 7/28/2011 12:53:56 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
> writes:
>
> Hello, I just joined the list and figured out how to browse/search. I am
> new to DNA as well. I am really just a lurking sole who doesn't know what to
> do with all of the dna info as of yet. FTDNA tells us customers to read
> the tutorials. I have been researching Keilty family history for just a few
> years here in the USA (paperwork genealogy).
>
> Bernard, your DNA shows quite a few off modal markers. That should make
> it easy to find other matches within your surname group should any appear.
> The problem is I only see one Keilty in the databases now - that's your
> own sample.
>
> Off modal matches refer to differences between the overall M222 group modal
> and your own DNA. You can easily check this yourself in a spreadsheet by
> comparing your own DNA to M5UKQ, which is the M222 modal on Ysearch. Modal
> just means the most common result at any given marker.
>
> Just to name a few:
>
> 389-1=14
> 458=18
> 437=16
> 449=29
> 464d=18
>
> There may be more. I didn't check each location. But that already is a
> lot at 25 markers.
>
> If you're wondering about matches with other surnames through DNA that's
> problematical. We have lots of family modals and some cluster modals in the
> project involving more than one surname. But most are just family modals.
>
> <I am interested in researching how far back the Keilty surname goes.
>
> For an answer to that you need to do research in Irish history. I looked
> up the surname Keilty in MacLysaght's Surnames of Ireland and found a few
> vague references which eventually led me to Quilty - but the Quilty
> references were mostly Munster (Limerick), Connacht, Down and surrounding counties,
> in short it's a surname with multiple origins. Unfortunately Tyrone is
> something of a black hole in Irish genealogy - there are no 1659 census
> returns and the Hearth Money records are spotty and difficult to find (I now the
> LDS have some on microfilm).
>
> The earliest records I can check for you are the Tithe Applotment Books
> which precede the Griffith's Valuations. These returns are from the CD which
> is notorious for missing records.
>
> The variant Keilty appears in Down (10), Antrim (3), Armagh (1). Two more
> variants in Down (Keiltie).
>
> The variant Keightly appears in Tyrone (3) Two in the parish of Arboe,
> one in Ballinderry.
>
> Archy Keightly
> Steward Keightly
> Saml. Keightly
>
> The variant Kielty appears in the same counties (Antrim, 3), Armagh (1),
> Down (1), Londonderry (1)
>
> I think these are all variants of the same surname. But I don't see any
> large concentration in one location except perhaps Co. Down. And even there
> it's not large.
>
> I only see one possible variant in the 1660 Heath Money Rolls for Antrim,
> a Kittelly, Abraham.
>
> The variant Keightly as found in Tryone appears to be an English surname.
> It's found in Ulster, lowland Scotland, northern England and all over
> England.
>
> _http://www.dynastree.co.uk/maps/detail/keightley.html_
> (http://www.dynastree.co.uk/maps/detail/keightley.html)
>
> There simply isn't a large enough concentration in Ulster in any one
> location for me to think this is a native Irish sept. But that could be wrong.
>
> I do not see any possible Keilty variants in the 1659 census returns for
> Antrim, Down or Armagh.
>
>
>
> John
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> R1b1c7 Research and Links:
>
> http://clanmaclochlainn.com/R1b1c7/
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