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Archiver > BRETHREN > 2000-04 > 0956931454


From: Cathy Martin <>
Subject: Slavery and Brethren
Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 10:17:34 -0400
References: <OFD35B810A.AB853887-ON052568CF.004AEB9E@manchester.edu>


Hi,

I would be tremendously grateful if the folks who contributed to the
e-mail discussion below would contact me. Also, if others have
information on this subject, I would be grateful to hear from you, too.
This is in regard to a writing project I am working on.

Thank you very much.

Cathy Martin

I wrote my Ph.D. thesis on antislavery activity in Virginia, 1831-1861.
As
well as I remember -- my copy is now loaned out to a friend -- Elder John
Klein of Rockingham County -- spoke out against slavery on occasion.
Also
ca 1832 an antislavery tract in a Virginia version of German was
published
in the Shenandoah Valley. I'm sorry to be so vague -- but it's been more
than 30 years since I did this. I'll try to retrieve my copy soon and
see
what I have. I do recall that my grandmother's uncle Benjamin Franklin
Moomaw of Bonsack (southern Botetourt County, VA) wrote a number of
letters
to the American Colonization Society, probably in the 1850s. I've got a
brief synopsis of all Virginia correspondence with the society and I can
also dig that out. But right now I'm trying to get some brief family
histories done for one of those county heritage commercial ventures.
They
are due this Monday so I can't do much till that's done.

Patricia Prickett Hickin

----- Original Message -----
From: <>
To: <>
Sent: Sunday, March 19, 2000 6:32 PM
Subject: SLAVERY & Brethren

> Brethren Encyclopedia says "The Brethren rejected both slavery and the
> abolition societies." Christopher Sauer II attacked the slave trade
as
> early as 1761 in his newspaper. "A letter from Johann van Laschet in
1775
> to the Brethren at Germantown reflects a long-standing opposition to
> slave-owning by the Brethren." Apparently Annual Meeting minnutes of
1782
> deal with the topic. "Repeatedly, Annual meeting denied the
legitimacy
of
> owning slaves and insisted that any Brethren holding them must set them
free
> in order to be a member in good standing (1797-1865). While generally
> keeping their distance from the active abolitionist societies &
underground
> railroad, BE says, "Descendants of JOHN PRICE living in the Pottstown
PA
area
> provided emrgency aid, including clothing, for the escaping slaves, as
did
> the FLORY family in Ohio.
>
> Annual meeting in 1851 permitted Brethren to contribute to the American
> Colonization Society (which was formed in 1817 to resettle free blacks
in
> Africa or elsewhere, proposing to provide a place to which freed slaves
could
> emigrate, such as Liberia). Brethren could contribute but not join.
1854
> Annual Meeting requiredi any slaveholder wishing to join the Brethren
to
> compensate his freed slaves for labor performed after they became
adults,
> thus allowing blacks to emigrate to freedom.
>
> Elder Samuel Weir of Botecourt Co., VA, born in 1812, was sold as a
slave
to
> Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McClure at the age of 12, serving them until he was
> nearly 30, when the McClures converted to Brethrenism and freed him.
Weir
> was baptized into the Brethren in 1843, the first black member received
by
> the church in that part of Virginia. Because liberated slaves in
Virginia
> were liable to be sold again into slavery, the Brethren in Virginia
decided
> it was urgent to move him to Ohio, which was done that same year.
>
> I would be interested in the difference in approach between Friends
(who
> were actively involved with the Underground Railroad) and the Brethren,
who
> seem to have had a different approach.
>
> Jan
>

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