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Archiver > ARIZARD > 2008-08 > 1219722055


From: "Pat Foster" <>
Subject: [ARIZARD] bushwhackers/Quantrill's girlfriend was a KING
Date: Mon, 25 Aug 2008 22:40:55 -0500
In-Reply-To: <001801c9054e$a528eb00$0201a8c0@cfoster>


Did the KING researchers read far enough to find this 15 year old
girlfriend, Kate Clarke King?
Quantrill's followers were in Kansas and Missouri and then others were
accused of being members of his group.


Pat
In Okla

-----Original Message-----
From: [mailto:] On
Behalf Of Pat Foster
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2008 1:33 PM
To:
Subject: [ARIZARD] bushwhackers/Quantrill


This word bushwhackers keeps appearing.
Some of you may not have heard of Quantrill's Raiders in Kansas and
Missouri?
There were spinoffs of his group, etc.

Here is part of an article from a website:
http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2004/sep/19/who_really_were/

Archive for Sunday, September 19, 2004
WHO REALLY WERE QUANTRILL RAIDERS?

Contrary to popular belief, the infamous raid of Lawrence on Aug. 21, 1863,
was a well-planned attack, not an impulsive assault by gun-slinging outlaws.

Weeks before the invasion, William C. Quantrill sent one of his spies to
town to discover just how vulnerable it was. Quantrill assessed his chances
of victory and knew the best opportunity would have to come under cover of
darkness.

The other misconception is that all 448 men who rode with Quantrill were
bent on killing innocent men. Not only is that not true, but some of the
riders may not even have been men. But I'll get to that in a moment.

As he surveyed the town before the sun rose, Quantrill, still cautious, sent
five of his best horsemen to check it out. He wanted to be certain the
residents of Lawrence were not waiting for him with weapons drawn. When his
horsemen returned, informing him that all seemed to be serene, Quantrill
heard some of his men grumbling about the wisdom of shooting up the town.
Some may have imagined they'd simply loot the stores. Others may have wanted
to kill certain notorious pro-slavery men. Still others, such as some of the
104 Confederates under Col. John Holt's command who had joined Quantrill,
may have believed they were there to engage in battle against Yankee
soldiers.

It's likely that not all of Quantrill's invaders were men. Two girls who may
have been participants in the raid were Kate Clarke King and Sallie Young.
Fifteen-year-old Kate was Quantrill's common-law wife. Dressed in men's
clothes, she often rode with her husband. Her motive for taking part was
likely loyalty to her husband as well as her desire for the treasures that
awaited her from looting.

This article is much longer than this.

Pat
BA, OK



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