ARIZARD-L Archives

Archiver > ARIZARD > 2001-05 > 0990475661


From: "Bill Dunn" <>
Subject: Re: [ARIZARD-L] Everett Family
Date: Mon, 21 May 2001 13:07:41 -0700


Eleanor,

I agree with you. I feel I am letting down my female ancestors when I can't
track them down, but males certainly are easier to locate. Thanks for the
URL.
Bill
-----Original Message-----
From: GEN-PICS <>
To: <>
Date: Sunday, May 20, 2001 9:07 PM
Subject: Re: [ARIZARD-L] Everett Family


>Bill,
>I am really bad about keeping up with the Everett women. I only heard the
Kester name because of Debbie talking about them, but I never really got a
handled on who they were. I was always told about how mean the Everett men
were as my great-grandmother was an Everett. You can see her picture under
George. And, then I found out about the feud and it all began to make sense
as to what my grandmother was telling me about her mother's family.. Debbie
got me interested in Jeremiah so I got to tracking down Jeremiah. Made a
trip to KY and got to hold his original signature in my hand. In VA I went
and visited his grave along with about a million other ticks. But, it was
all very exciting.
>
>Steve's site is 209.196.125.11/everett
>
>Eleanor
>
>
>
>Bill Dunn wrote:
> >
> > Eleanor,
> >
> > Are you talking about the site that Steve Bemrich is hosting? I was a
> > contributor to that site a while ago. For awhile I felt that my GGG
> > grandfather, William "Billy" Kester, might be a son of Isaac and Union
> > Kester but now I'm pretty certain he is Isaac's brother. Could you
provide a
> > current URL since I believe I lost it when my computer last crashed?
> >
> > Bill
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: GEN-PICS <>
> > To: <>
> > Date: Sunday, May 20, 2001 7:18 PM
> > Subject: Re: [ARIZARD-L] Everett Family
> >
> >
> > >Hi! Bill,
> > >Do you know about the Everett web site?
> > >Eleanor
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >Bill Dunn wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Eleanor,
> > > >
> > > > Just wanted to let you know that I am related to Isaac Kester that
> > married
> > > > Union Everett. He is a fourth great uncle.
> > > >
> > > > bill
> > > >
> > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > From: GEN-PICS <>
> > > > To: <>
> > > > Date: Sunday, May 20, 2001 5:12 AM
> > > > Subject: Re: [ARIZARD-L] Everett Family
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > >Jean, do you know where a copy of this book is located? This is a
new
> > one
> > > > that I have not heard about before. Is there anything more about
the
> > > > membership of the Baptist church that was begun? I know that
Jeremiah
> > had
> > > > gone to church in Barren Co. KY at one point in his life. I doubt
the
> > sons
> > > > ever did. It just seems like he might have been a member and could
> > possibly
> > > > be buried nearby if there was a cemetery. I mistyped the date that
I
> > last
> > > > found Jeremiah. It should have been 1831 and not 1833. I feel sure
> > that he
> > > > died and was buried here. I don't know what happened to his
wife--Alice
> > > > (Alcy) Saunders Everett.
> > > > >
> > > > >Thank you very much.
> > > > >Eleanor
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > > This account might interest you. This is taken from the
Jehoiada J.
> > > > SAMS
> > > > > > Journal, chapter 21:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > The Tutt and Everet War
> > > > > > Chapter 21
> > > > > > At an early date the Everet Brothers come to the valley of
> > > > > > White River. They first came to Lawrence county on Black River,
> > > > > > and a short time afterwards they moved to White River and
settled
> > > > > > in the west end of Izard County, in that part which is now
> > > > > > situated in Marion County.
> > > > > > Their families consisted of old Sim, and Jess and old Bart.
> > > > > > A part of them were mechanics, if not all. They were noted for
> > > > > > being men of honestiy and uprightness in all their transactions.
> > > > > > But they were celebrated for their activity, manhood and
bravery.
> > > > > > They were given a right smart to fighting with their men and few
> > > > > > men could handle them in a combat.
> > > > > > It was old Jess who encountered John P. Houston, a brother
> > > > > > of Old Sam Houston who was first Govenor of Texas. Old Jess and
> > > > > > Houston met at the Mouth of Big North Fork the county seat of
> > > > > > Izard county at that time and got to talking of the removal of
> > > > > > the county seat. They had got to pretty plain talk, when Houston
> > > > > > said, "that no one but a D---- raskal would want the county seat
> > > > > > moved," then jumped to his feet and made a move as if to draw a
> > > > > > pistol. But Everet was watching him and had a pistol out and
> > > > > > cocked. He presented it to Houston's breast and told him that if
> > > > > > he made amove he would shoot a hole through him that a ground
hog
> > > > > > could walk through. This man Houston was Circuit Clerk at the
> > > > > > time and had been for several years. he was a good lawyer when
> > > > > > not under the influence of whiskey. The report followed him here
> > > > > > that he had killed two men in South Carolina. He brought a large
> > > > > > library here with him.
> > > > > > He finally drank himself to death at Maj. Wolf's at Mouth of
> > > > > > Big North Fork, Arkansas, 1836. After Yellville was laid off as
> > > > > > a town, Hansford Tutt, a man of some property settled there. He
> > > > > > was perhaps a North Carolinear, and not generally liked.
> > > > > > After a time a difficulty grew up between the Everet and
> > > > > > Tutts, and continued to grow year after year as it was
occasionly
> > > > > > rekindled by combats in which the Everets came off best. This
> > > > > > feud progressed for some ten years or more and finally resulted
> > > > > > in the formation of two hostile parties know as the Tutt and
> > > > > > Everett parties. There were few citizens who were not in some
> > > > > > way or other indentified with one or the other of these parties.

> > > > > > In the meantime old Jess Everet had gone to Texas, but the
> > > > > > contention did not abate by his leaving Young men had grown uup
> > > > > > with all the bitterness of the contention engrafted in their
> > > > > > bosom.
> > > > > > In the summer of 1848 Jess Turner had an appointment to
> > > > > > speak at Yellville as Presidential Elector. This called out a
> > > > > > great number of people, and among them the Tutts and EVeretts
> > > > > > were well represented, and a preliminary fight or tow rallied
the
> > > > > > fighting men of both sides in line.
> > > > > > At this critical moment a terrible whirlwind swept over
> > > > > > the crowd, scattered their hats and filled the air with dust.
> > > > > > This so confused the crowd that they dispersed, for a time. The
> > > > > > Everet party, who lived in the country mounted their horses and
> > > > > > rode off, but before they had got out of hearing the noise of
> > > > > > another row reached their ears. The Everets wheeled their
> > > > > > horses, dashed back dismounted and then the fight commenced in
> > > > > > earnest. In a few moments four or five men were killed and
> > > > > > several others knocked down and wounded. There were four
> > > > > > brothers named King, who figured as champions on the Tutt side.
> > > > > > Old Sim and Bart Everet seemed to be the most dreaded by the
> > > > > > Tutt gang, and it was said, that they were held by their arms
and
> > > > > > shot by the Tutt gang. They both were killed and young France
> > > > > > Everet was wounded. All that were killed were of the Everet
> > > > > > gang, the Futts having taken advantage of them in the charge.
> > > > > > Young France immediately left for Texas for his uncle Jess. Old
> > > > > > Jess, on receiving France's report made his will, armed himself
> > > > > > took young France and a man by the name of Stratton and come
back
> > > > > > to Arkansas. They arrested the King brothers over toward the
> > > > > > Arkansas river, and started to Yellville with them. They took
> > > > > > them a short distance and killed three of them. The fourth one
> > > > > > made his escape.
> > > > > > Soon afterwards a shot was fired at Old Hamp Tutt from
> > > > > > ambush without taking effect. He then quartered himself at home
> > > > > > with a strong guard about his house. Old Jess Everets could not,
> > > > > > now get to himm.
> > > > > > A writ was placed in the hands of the sheriff for Old Jess.
> > > > > > The sheriff took about one hundred men and went to where old
Jess
> > > > > > was known to be, and finding him, he found that old Jess had
more
> > > > > > men than he had. Old Jess offered fight and told the sheriff to
> > > > > > "pull in". Old Jess had his men under the brow of a hill ready
> > > > > > for action. He run un and down the hill telling the sheriff that
> > > > > > if he wanted to fight to just fire on gun. Old Jess told his men
> > > > > > to hold themselves in readiness and not fire until he gave the
> > > > > > command and then give them hades.
> > > > > > The sheriff would not accept the change. He went back to
> > > > > > town and made an application to the govenor for five hundred
> > > > > > militia.The malitia succedded in capturing old Jess, Stratton
and
> > > > > > Young Jess.
> > > > > > They put them in the Smithville jail, in Lawrence county,
> > > > > > Arkansas. Soon after a party of about twelve men went and broke
> > > > > > the lock of the jail and liberated them. They then mounted them
> > > > > > on horses and rode away in triumph.
> > > > > > The news of old Jess being liberated made old Hamp stick the
> > > > > > closer to his quarters. Some months after old Jess was liberated
> > > > > > old Hamp stepped outside his door just at day light one morning,
> > > > > > and was washing his face, when a ball was fired at him striking
> > > > > > the bowl in which he was washing. After some months of fruitless
> > > > > > efforts to get old Hamp, Old Jess was known to go to Texas,
where
> > > > > > he died soon after. It was generally believed that Jess Everett
> > > > > > left some oneless known to Hamp Tutt than himself to watch Tutts
> > > > > > movements.
> > > > > > There was a man killed occasionally. Old Hamp still kept
> > > > > > close quarters. These times kept on for about twelve months when
> > > > > > old Hamp got to going around, generally between to other
persons.
> > > > > > In this situation he was shot from ambush with a long range gun,
> > > > > > whilst walking in a retired street. He died in a few days after
> > > > > > being shot. he told his friends to let his be the end of this
> > > > > > affair. This was known as the Tutt and Everet war.
> > > > > > I will give you a more extended account of the opening of
> > > > > > the Smithville Jail. If I was not there, there were others that
> > > > > > were. There were only twelve there I know, for I made the
> > > > > > crowbar that broke the lock. It took two men with the crowbar to
> > > > > > brake the lock of the jail. If any of you wish to see the
> > > > > > crowbar you can find it by coming to my house in Fulton County.
> > > > > > It has been forty eight years since this happened.
> > > > > > The hostilities of this Tutt and Everet was lasted about
> > > > > > twenty months, during which time there were about fourteen men
> > > > > > killed. The parties of this war, who escaped, dispensed to other
> > > > > > countries. It was generally thought that the sympathies of the
> > > > > > outsiders were largely with the Everets.
> > > > > > I will tell you a little more that happened about this war,
> > > > > > concerning old Mat, Adams and Dearl Woods, his son-in-law. It
> > > > > > seems that Dearl Woods had got tired of the war. He sent word to
> > > > > > Adams, wanting to knowif he would go home and have no more to do
> > > > > > with the war if he would be in any danger. Old Mat sent word
> > > > > > back that he thought not, providing some one diden't have a wet
> > > > > > load in their gun they might try at him to see if it would fire.
> > > > > > (D)Earl was on the Tutt side and Mat was on the Everet side.
> > > > > > Old Mat Adams was a brother to Peter F. Adams who killed Dr.
> > > > > > Huff, that I have spoken of before in these pages. I was well
> > > > > > acquainted with the Adamses. They were good farmers and stock
> > > > > > raisers, and made money. They were pure grit, but peaceable men
> > > > > > when you let their business alone.
> > > > > > Chapter 22
> > > > > > About the year 1830 Judge James Wren and the Hightower
> > > > > > family come to Izard county from the vicinity of Bolingreen,
> > > > > > Kentuckey. Judge James Wren was a remarkable man for his habits
> > > > > > of industry and christianity. It was throught his
> > > > > > instrumentality that the first baptist church was organized in
> > > > > > Izard county Arkansas. In the year 1830, he got a few scattering
> > > > > > Baptist together and sent to Spring River and got a Baptist
> > > > > > minister to organize a Baptist church near the mouth of Piney
> > > > > > Bayou. I was present at the organization of the church.
> > > > > > Judge Wren never aspired a great deal to office. He was,
> > > > > > however induced to accept a term or two as county Judge of Izard
> > > > > > county. When he come to Izard county he brought with him six
> > > > > > children. He had had no death in his family up that time, but at
> > > > > > this writing they are most all dead as are most of the first
> > > > > > settlers of the White river valey.
> > > > > > In those good old days it was not imposible for young men to
> > > > > > get to the highest office, although our school oportunities were
> > > > > > few. Schools were not plenty then as they are here now, and fat,
> > > > > > slick headed boys, who slept at night rarely ever derived any
> > > > > > benefit from them. However there were a class of boys who grew
> > > > > > up in the valey of White river, in that time, who would do honor
> > > > > > to that or any other time or country. Of these might be
> > > > > > mentioned some of the Wolf boys some of the Harris boys, some of
> > > > > > the Jeffrey boys, some of the Trimble boys, some of the Coker
> > > > > > boys, some of the Miller boys and many others whom I could
> > > > > > mention. One of this class of boys got to be governor of
> > > > > > Arkansas, one of the Jeffrey got to legislature, and one of
these
> > > > > > gents was elected three terms as county Judge of Izard county
> > > > > > arkansas and declined a fourth term. I do not believe in any man
> > > > > > holding office more that three terms. [hand writing says,
> > > > > > something like "possibly ? Trimble might be mentioned in this
> > > > > > connection]
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
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