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Archiver > AMERICAN-REVOLUTION > 2003-07 > 1058462824


From: "lguzman" <>
Subject: [AMER-REV] Lady Washington
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2003 12:27:07 -0500
References: <NDBBIEMOKPKPFPELHOOFKEEBKPAA.rfhouston@mindspring.com>


I have to confess I'm sometimes jolted when I read Mrs. Washington referred
to as "Lady Washington."

Now, while that may be a term of respect during that time period, does
anyone know if there were ever any rumblings against calling her that
(because it potentially smacked of "nobility")????

If she was a "Lady," doesn't that imply that General Washington was a
"Lord?"

And am I correct in assuming this is where the term "First Lady" comes from?

Lila
----- Original Message -----
From: "Rhonda Houston" <>
To: <>
Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2003 10:14 PM
Subject: RE: [AMER-REV] Mr., Sir, or President


> It sounds like the question that should be addressed is that one of where
> does the respect come from; I agree with you that it's from the position
> held...
>
> the position occupied is what matters, such as supreme court judges on the
> highest court of the land; their decisions once made null and void all
other
> court decisions and of course, that is why there is an odd number of
judges
> placed on this high court...and once out of office, these people will be
> just like anyone else...
>
> however, I'm inclined to think that again, there is that halo effect that
> follows each one of these individuals around and does so until their time
on
> this earth ends. The position of the President is that he is the
> commander-in-chief of all our military forces and can over ride any
civilian
> order when he cares to by establishing marital law which means the rules
of
> the military are the last word, which Lincoln put into play during the
civil
> war in the south.
>
> 'Respect should be given, properly,'; after working with juvenile
offenders
> for 6 years, I have come to realized that one can ever make someone else
do
> something they don't want to do, and wasn't that one of our freedoms for
> which some of those who didn't make it home fought for...the first few
> freedoms called the Bill of Rights, so to say we who hold no office are
> merely 'plain' people who are those who vote and harass our
representatives
> to listen to what it is that we really want, we carry alot of power,
weight,
> and aren't really so plain.
>
> Rhonda
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Eva Dayle Zippay [mailto:]
> Sent: Wednesday, July 16, 2003 1:58 PM
> To:
> Subject: [AMER-REV] Mr., Sir, or President
>
>
>
>
>
> What happened to the President being called "Mr. President?" Now, it seems
> to me that's the ultimate in respect.
>
> I've been noticing that the news media does NOT afford that honorific to
the
> President most of the time, and it bothers me. After all, we are a nation
of
> Mr.'s, Mrs.', Sirs, and Ma'am's, but we have only one President.
>
> Also (an afterthought), our military services are full of "Sirs"--my son
was
> one of them. But he wasn't the President.
>
> Respect should be given, properly, where respect is due, regardless of
one's
> personal or political views. In this country we honor the office, not the
> man. Some people forget that, including some who hold the office. We
plain
> people shouldn't.
>
>
>
> Eva in Tallahassee
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------
>
>
>
>
> Eva Dayle Zippay
> Tallahassee, Florida
>
>
> ---------------------------------
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>
>
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